Liver Cancer Survival Rate Uk

To calculate the kidney cancer survival rate, you must take several different factors into consideration. Generally speaking, these factors are related to the patient who has been diagnosed with kidney cancer, and the kidney cancer stage..

In gathering their survival rate statistics, researchers take the type of cancer, stage, grade and location into consideration. Factors regarding the patient that must be considered include the individual's age, general health, and ability to undergo necessary treatment.

Using data reflecting these factors in recent decades, medical researchers have been able to generate some statistics for kidney cancer survival rates. Just one type of kidney cancer is shown below, but it is far more common than any other variety. It is known as renal cell carcinoma.

When the kidney cancer survival rate is calculated, it's most often expressed as a percentage. That is, it's statistically normal for a certain percent of patients who have the same type of cancer at approximately the same stage to still be alive after a defined period of time.

It should be said that the kidney cancer survival rate is a generalization based on a huge number of cases that occurred over a long time. There's no way to predict what will happen in any individual case.

As is the case with most other diseases, the kidney cancer survival rate is measured in five year periods. In other words, a certain percentage of patients found to have kidney cancer will survive for a minimum of five years after their diagnosis.

There are a variety of categories that can be listed for kidney cancer survival rates.. The statistics in this article measure the survival rate of kidney cancer patients compared with the general population. This data comes from a study done between 1995 and 2001.

During this interval, the overall survival rate for kidney cancer patients was 64.6 percent.

The numbers were broken down further by race and gender. These were

* 64.7 percent of Caucasian males survived for at least 5 years

* The statistic was almost exactly the same for Caucasian women at 64.5 percent.

* The number for African American Men was slightly lower: 61.8 percent

* African American women had the highest survival rate, coming in at just under 66 percent

The survival rate also depends on the stage the cancer has reached by the time it's diagnosed. A higher stage assignment means the cancer has spread more and will therefore be more difficult to treat.

Approximately 53 percent of kidney cancer cases are found before cancer cells have spread beyond the kidneys.

1 case in 5 or twenty percent is diagnosed after cancer cells have spread beyond the kidneys to nearby lymph nodes, tissues or organs.

Slightly more than one in five cases - 22 percent - are diagnosed when cancer cells have reached distant tissues or organs.

Stages were unclear in the rest of the kidney cancer cases that were included in the study.

You won't be surprised to learn that the sooner the cancer was diagnosed, the longer the patient was likely to survive.

* 9 out of 10 patients who were diagnosed when cancer was confined to the kidneys survived at least five years.

* The survival rate dropped to 60 percent for those whose cancer had spread to regions near the kidneys.

* The survival rate was only 9.7 percent when cancer had spread to distant organs and tissues elsewhere in the body.

* Stage information was unclear or undiagnosed for the remaining percentage of patients.

The highest percentage of kidney cancer occurs in the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, along with Northern Europe. Kidney cancer occurs least often in China, Thailand and the Philippines. Of all cancer cases diagnosed in the United States, 1 in every 33 is kidney cancer.

Two smokers develop kidney cancer for every non-smoker who gets the disease. The risk for renal pelvis cancer is even greater for smokers at 4 to 1.


Liver Cancer Survival Rate Stage 2

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Liver Transplant Hospitals In Hyderabad

LIVER Transplant

Liver damage from cirrhosis cannot be reversed, but treatment can stop or delay further progression and reduce complications. Treatment depends on the cause of cirrhosis and any complications a person is experiencing. Regardless of the cause of cirrhosis, it is essential that every patient avoid all substances, habits and drugs that may further damage the liver or cause complications or liver failure.....

There have been over 60 different liver diseases treated with liver transplantation. However, there are several conditions that are more commonly treated with this procedure. They are frequently conditions that cause chronic or continuing liver inflammation. As the inflammation heals, fibrous tissue forms, much like a scar forms when a cut in the skin heals. Severe and advanced scarring of the liver is called Cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is not reversible and leads to end stage liver disease....

Live Donor Liver Transplant

Living liver donation Introduction : -

Liver donation is possible from a living donor who is a relative of the recipient who can donate half his/her liver. The donor operation is entirely safe and the half liver quickly regenerates in both the donor and the recipient in a few weeks. In the first few days after operation even when regeneration is not complete, the half liver is enough to maintain normal donor functions due to the immense reserve in the liver.....

Children's Liver Transplant

A liver transplant is recommended for children who have serious liver dysfunction and will not be able to live without having the liver replaced. The most common liver disease in children for which transplants are done is biliary atresia. Other diseases may include Alagille syndrome, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Wilson's disease, hepatitis, and hemochromatosis.....

Building on a Legacy of Innovation

We Care India partner hospital transplant teams are comprised of surgeons, medical specialists, nurse coordinators, social workers and ancillary staff members who provide superior, specialized expertise in all related transplant services. From careful pre-transplant monitoring to post-surgical care, Stanford's strong emphasis on continuous quality improvement creates better outcomes for transplant patients.

We Care India partner hospital has long been at the forefront of the field, home to both the first adult heart transplant in the US and the first heart-lung transplant in the world. The transplant programs at We Care India partner hospital have earned a number of distinctions in the field, including the #1 ranking in the country in both patient and graft survival for kidney transplant.....

At We Care India partner hospital, transplant unit was established in 1997 with a view to providing state-of-the-art tertiary level care and service in liver and renal transplantation......

Facilities and expertise available : -

  • Liver Transplantation for children and adults with acute and chronic liver failure /cirrhosis
  • Living related Liver transplant and Cadaveric transplant
  • Pediatric hepatology service including transplant and biliary surgery
  • Adult Hepatology and Gastroenterology
  • Renal Transplantation in adults and children including Lap Donor Nephrectomy
  • Complex vascular and peritoneal access procedures
  • Complex Hepatobiliary Surgery....

Hospitals in Hyderabad, India

Hospitals in Hyderabad are attracting travelers looking for medical treatment. Everyday thousands of people from the US and Europe are waking up to the phenomenon called medical tourism that has become quite a rage in recent times.

Major medical tourism promoting hospitals in Hyderabad are Apollo Hospital Health City, Jubilee Hills Hyderabad and Global Hospitals, Hyderabad. These hospitals have been accredited by national and international hospital accreditation bodies and are well equipped to take medical and personal care of International Patients.

Hyderabad is also well placed for the convenience of medical travelers. It is well connected to major air hubs, has some of the good shopping places, accommodation outside the hospital is not costly and tourist vehicles are freely available to move about. Plenty of excursion options are also available.....

The list of Liver Transplant Hospitals in Hyderabad is as follows : -

A ] Apollo Hospital, Hyderabad

Apollo Hospitals, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad is a 550-bed tertiary care centre. It has over 50 medical and surgical disciplines. Spread over a campus area of 35 acres, the hospital has a built-up area of 190,000 square feet. Its services are supported by sophisticated technology and experienced medical professionals.

The first PET CT Scanner in India was installed at Apollo Hospitals, Hyderabad in January of 2005......

Please log on to : www.indiahospitaltour.com

Send your query : Get a Quote

We Care Core Values

We have a very simple business model that keeps you as the centre.

Having the industry's most elaborate and exclusive Patient Care and Clinical Coordination teams stationed at each partner hospital, we provide you the smoothest and seamless care ever imagined. With a ratio of one Patient Care Manager to five patients our patient care standards are unmatched across the sub continent.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    My mom has stage 4 liver cancer shes 72 years old. she start treatment next week.What is the survival rate?
    She first was diagnosed with ovarian cancer 2 years ago and was successful with surgery and treatment.Now its 4th stage liver and a small spot on the abdomen. How should I prepare myself and my family? Thanks Concern Daughter

    • ANSWER:
      Very sorry to read and say stage 4 liver cancer is the terminal stage.
      All treatment options(Very limited) are just palliative and prognosis is poor.
      You and your family must develop mental strength to face inevitable outcome.
      In such cases Hospice care is highly recommended.

  2. QUESTION:
    Survival Rate? Colon Cancer, also 3 shadows on Liver, to be looked into later!?
    Colon Cancer: Surgery 9 days ago, removed 1 tumour @ 6 inches of colon/rectum and 25 lymph nodes, 15 found to containn cancer. Stage 3-C, Recovery within 2 days. Removed from IV in 3 days, removed catheter in 3 days, walking in 2 days, Released in 4 days.
    Pulse 128/68. constant, Temp 98* constant, heart rate 75 beats p/m. Great shape, healthy except for this.
    Morphine stopped on second day, aspirin only afterwards.
    Platelets at 56 - 67. 5 units of plasma and Vit. K injections. Received whole blood during operation.
    History, HCV for 35 years, Renal carcenomia 10 years ago, Pancreatitious 1 year ago, Family history, Father & grandfather died of Liver Cancer at age of 65 and 40 respectivally. Sister with Ovarian cancer.

    • ANSWER:

  3. QUESTION:
    Cancer Survival Rate Question?
    My husband has stage 4 lung/liver cancer. I dont have the technical name but basically its lung cancer living inside his liver(along with two other types they couldnt identify or at least thats what they said). They could not be sure exactly where the origin was even tho the main cancer they found in his liver identifies as lung.

    He was told around 2 years with treatment. However, the chemo he was on his marrow couldnt tolerate so we had to stop. They had no other chemo meds they thought would be helpful or the like. So right now he is not being treated as they dont have a game plan really.

    Does anyone have a good website about survival rates for this type of cancer. He was told 2 yrs with treatment but that shifted to 1-2 yrs and now noones talking and since he cant do chemo and he
    was hit and miss with it as is once his platelets started dropping and not wanting to come back up...where does this leave us?

    I just want an idea for my own mental knowledge. Thank you for any help given!
    SUZE~because they dont know the origin radiology was out of the question. As for oral drugs they want to start him on something called Tarceva but he is very weary about taking it because of the side effects especially the bleeding part cuz his spleen is very enlarged.

    The original diagnosis was undefined small cell carcinoma. However, on the screen in the doctors office Ive seen the word A---carcinoma(word reminded me of arachnicarcinoma, cant recall the exact spelling)with unknown origin.
    Those are the only things I know about the specific name. During his sporatic chemo session and two sets of scans done there has been no real growth nor shrinkage. Its basically stayed the same with the exception of his spleen that keeps growing.

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry, but small cell lung cancer are aggressive and without treatment I would not expect him to survive more than 9 months or so.
      Please talk to his doctor about hospice he may not need it right now, but when he does you will not have to think about. They are great about answering your questions and managing pain. The time has come where you need to concentrate on the quality of the life he has left not the number of months.
      Best wishes.

      P.S.
      If he has 2 cancers the other one is probably adenocarcinoma.

  4. QUESTION:
    What do you think of this article...was McCain being transparent when....?
    asked to release his medical records?

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/09/30/new-urgency-over-mccain-m_n_130298.html

    Specifically, here is an excerpt:

    Provided with only a scant review of the information, questions have begun to rise as to the danger of McCain's most recent bout with cancer. Bronow noted that there are two reports detailing the stage of McCain's latest (his fourth) bout with melanoma. One report put it at a stage 2a, which has a relatively high five-year survival rate; another put it at a stage 3b, which is much more dire in nature.

    "As a dermatologist, if I hear about a stage three melanoma, I say 'My God this guy is walking on nails here," said Bronow. "There is that much difference between a stage 2 and a stage 3."

    Asked to detail his notes, Gupta said the pathology report - which lists the size and other attributes of the cancer removed - indicated a stage 2a:

    "It was 2 centimeters across, 0.22 centimeters deep, and not ulcerated, which gives him a 66 percent survival rate over ten years. Melanoma is a particularly aggressive cancer. Mainly because skin is the largest organ in the body it can spread to the lungs, liver and the brain... Most of the occurrences will occur right away. I am reassured by the fact that it has been eight years now and there hasn't been a reemergence of that melanoma."

    Apparently none of the news stations will touch this subject...I cant imagine WHY.

    • ANSWER:
      With everything else that's gone on why should news like this be any more of a surprise than anything else?


Liver Cancer Survival Rate Stage 4

Because staging the cancer can take some time patients are anxious to drop the process and directly begin treatment. Stage 4 Brain Cancer Survival Rate But the fact is that determining cancer stages automatically helps your health care team and you to know the exact position of your cancer and determine which cancer treatment is suitable or the best for you.

What is staging:
Staging is generally a process whereby one can find out the precise cancer stages in relation to growth, location and type. The information is then used by the doctors in order to plan the best treatment for the patient and predict the prognosis. In this way certain cancers at the same stage would be treated in a similar manner. These stages of cancer are also ways for doctors to refer to the extent of cancers in particular patients.

It is very important to know details about stages in cancer especially as doctors have to know the location of the cancer in the body and the amount of cancer present in the body so as to ensure that the patient gets the best treatment possible. For example, if a patient's breast cancer has been detected early, then the best treatment for her would be either surgery or radiation. But if the breast cancer has been detected at an advanced stage the treatment would be chemotherapy. By studying the cancer stages doctors can also predict the course that the cancer will most likely take.

These stages are based to ascertain the following three factors:
a The size of the primary/original tumor and whether the tumor has spread into areas nearby.
a Whether the cancer has grown/spread into the lymph nodes.
a Whether the cancer has grown/spread to other distant areas of the patient's body.

Lung Cancer Secrets Revealed Click here

Cancers like leukemia cannot be staged like this as they are spread in all parts of the body through the blood. In the same way brain cancers are also not staged using the normal TNM system as they disrupt body and brain functions even before they spread.

Different information about a particular type of cancer is gathered by the doctor before determining cancer stages. Staging would therefore depend on the location of the cancer which can be done by physical examination, CT scans, MRIs, X-rays etc. It is necessary to perform biopsies (removal of tumors or pieces of cancerous tumors) to confirm whether they are benign or malignant. These samples are removed during surgery or biopsy procedures that are less invasive.

Types of determining stages or "staging procedures":
a Clinical Staging: Done during "diagnosis" before any type of treatment is administered.
a Pathologic Staging: Done on patients who have undergone surgery to either take out the cancer or to determine the amount of cancer in the body.
a Restaging: Done if the cancer recurs (comes back) after treatment to find out the extent and helps to decide the best treatment.

lung cancer treatment breakthroughs Click here

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    My mom has stage 4 liver cancer shes 72 years old. she start treatment next week.What is the survival rate?
    She first was diagnosed with ovarian cancer 2 years ago and was successful with surgery and treatment.Now its 4th stage liver and a small spot on the abdomen. How should I prepare myself and my family? Thanks Concern Daughter

    • ANSWER:
      Very sorry to read and say stage 4 liver cancer is the terminal stage.
      All treatment options(Very limited) are just palliative and prognosis is poor.
      You and your family must develop mental strength to face inevitable outcome.
      In such cases Hospice care is highly recommended.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate for someone with stage 4 ovarian cancer which has spread to the brain, she is 84?
    my gran has been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, which has spread to liver, lung and brain, she is not been given any treatment and is being kept comfortable. Could anyone advise on what we can expect, i really don't want her to suffer.

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry. It is so difficult to watch and wait while someone you love goes through this.

      Each case is different, so no one can say for sure "how long". My sister made it 6 weeks after the cancer was found to have spread to her brain. She slept a lot and didn't eat much. At first, when she was awake she was quite alert, but toward the end, she was out of it most of the time.

      The medication that my sister was given for pain must have been quite effective, because she didn't complain of discomfort nor were there any indications that she was in any distress. She finally simply went to sleep and didn't wake up.

      God bless you and your family...

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate of a person with Stage 4 breast cancer who just suffered a stroke?
    A 48 year old woman, diagnosed on 12/4/08 with stage 4 breast cancer (mets to brain, lungs, liver and spine) suffered a stroke on 1/30/09, during a chemotherapy treatment. The stroke left her paralyzed on her left side, with limited mobility in her hand/arm/shoulder. She can't walk, and she has "mental mis-fires."

    Her family (particularly her mother) is in denial about the grimness of her condition. Her husband (they're somewhat estranged, but he is "doing the right thing") wants to put her in a rehab/hospice setting, because she can't climb stairs. (They live in an old rowhouse. . .no bathroom on the main floor.) Her mother, on the other hand, has come up with this crazy idea to rent an apartment and care for her there. ?????

    Does anyone have any experience with a situation like this? What is this woman's realistic survival rate? Would hospice be the appropriate move at this point?
    Her survival was said to be about 2 months, which it has already been. X-rays of lungs show that they are completely covered with cancer cells. The doctor has suggested hospice/rehab.
    . . .but her mother doesn't want that.
    Prairie Girl. . .I told them the very same thing, but was treated like I was nuts. My dad had a stroke, but survived 10 years afterwards. He was a total invalid. My mother insisted on caring for him at home. That lasted about two years, and took a huge toll on ALL of us, as we were required to chip in with his care. My brother (49) died of lung cancer that had metastasized to his brain, liver and bones. My sister just last year died of kidney failure at age 60. All three were in hospice at the end of there lives, as it was extremely difficult--physically, as well as emotionally--to care for them at home.

    Unfortunately, her mother does not respect anyone's opinion except her own. Thought "maybe it's me" for a minute.
    . . .and very sorry to hear about your Dad.

    • ANSWER:
      Stage 4 usually means a very limited time is left. Her mother loves her and wants to help her, but she isn't realizing how much care she's going to need. It would be better for her to be in Hospice and have her mother be there to enjoy the time they have left together. My dad had lung cancer and when they realized it had spread to his brain he only lived 6 more weeks. It's a very sad situation. Be there for your friend in any way you can, because your time together is limited.

  4. QUESTION:
    Survival Rate? Colon Cancer, also 3 shadows on Liver, to be looked into later!?
    Colon Cancer: Surgery 9 days ago, removed 1 tumour @ 6 inches of colon/rectum and 25 lymph nodes, 15 found to containn cancer. Stage 3-C, Recovery within 2 days. Removed from IV in 3 days, removed catheter in 3 days, walking in 2 days, Released in 4 days.
    Pulse 128/68. constant, Temp 98* constant, heart rate 75 beats p/m. Great shape, healthy except for this.
    Morphine stopped on second day, aspirin only afterwards.
    Platelets at 56 - 67. 5 units of plasma and Vit. K injections. Received whole blood during operation.
    History, HCV for 35 years, Renal carcenomia 10 years ago, Pancreatitious 1 year ago, Family history, Father & grandfather died of Liver Cancer at age of 65 and 40 respectivally. Sister with Ovarian cancer.

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    Cancer Survival Rate Question?
    My husband has stage 4 lung/liver cancer. I dont have the technical name but basically its lung cancer living inside his liver(along with two other types they couldnt identify or at least thats what they said). They could not be sure exactly where the origin was even tho the main cancer they found in his liver identifies as lung.

    He was told around 2 years with treatment. However, the chemo he was on his marrow couldnt tolerate so we had to stop. They had no other chemo meds they thought would be helpful or the like. So right now he is not being treated as they dont have a game plan really.

    Does anyone have a good website about survival rates for this type of cancer. He was told 2 yrs with treatment but that shifted to 1-2 yrs and now noones talking and since he cant do chemo and he
    was hit and miss with it as is once his platelets started dropping and not wanting to come back up...where does this leave us?

    I just want an idea for my own mental knowledge. Thank you for any help given!
    SUZE~because they dont know the origin radiology was out of the question. As for oral drugs they want to start him on something called Tarceva but he is very weary about taking it because of the side effects especially the bleeding part cuz his spleen is very enlarged.

    The original diagnosis was undefined small cell carcinoma. However, on the screen in the doctors office Ive seen the word A---carcinoma(word reminded me of arachnicarcinoma, cant recall the exact spelling)with unknown origin.
    Those are the only things I know about the specific name. During his sporatic chemo session and two sets of scans done there has been no real growth nor shrinkage. Its basically stayed the same with the exception of his spleen that keeps growing.

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry, but small cell lung cancer are aggressive and without treatment I would not expect him to survive more than 9 months or so.
      Please talk to his doctor about hospice he may not need it right now, but when he does you will not have to think about. They are great about answering your questions and managing pain. The time has come where you need to concentrate on the quality of the life he has left not the number of months.
      Best wishes.

      P.S.
      If he has 2 cancers the other one is probably adenocarcinoma.

  6. QUESTION:
    Can you survive stage 4 breast cancer?
    I just found out that my aunt has moved up to stage 4 breast cancer that has spread to her liver, lymnode, leg, neck etc. I don't know much about cancer and all I really want to know is what is the survival rate when you've reached stage 4? The doctors plan on Chemo therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Stage 4 breast cancer has spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes to other parts of the body.

      In stage IV breast cancer, the cancer has spread elsewhere in the body. Affected areas may include the bones, brain, lungs, or liver. Because multiple areas may be involved, focused treatments like surgery or radiation alone are not sufficient. So far, treatment of stage IV breast cancer does not provide a cure for the disease. By shrinking the cancer, treatment can slow down the disease, make you feel better, and let you live longer. Although patients with stage IV breast cancer may live for years, it is usually life-threatening at some point. Many factors influence this

      * Chemotherapy , or treatment with cancer drugs, is often the main treatment. It can slow down the growth of the cancer. Chemotherapy is often used in combination with hormone therapy or immunotherapy.
      * Hormone therapy can be key for women with hormone receptor-positive cancers. These are cancers that need hormones to grow. Tamoxifen has been used to block the effects of estrogen for decades. But newer drugs, like the aromatase inhibitors Arimidex and Femara, and the aromatase inactivator Aromasin, also show great promise. They reduce the amount of estrogen your body makes. By cutting off the supply of estrogen, you can choke the cancer and slow it down. Women who haven't reached menopause may consider having their ovaries removed to stop them from making hormones that help cancer grow.
      * Biological therapy is a new approach. In about 25% of women with breast cancer, an excess of a protein known as HER2 makes the cancer spread quickly. Herceptin is a new drug that's been approved to treat women with metastatic breast cancer that is HER2-positive. It stops this protein from making the cancer cells grow. It may also boost your immune system, giving it the strength to fight the cancer itself. It is most often used in combination with chemotherapy.
      * Clinical trials are open to many women with stage IV cancer. A clinical trial may allow you access to cutting-edge treatments. Many new therapies -- new drugs, new treatments, and new combinations -- are in clinical trials now. Keep in mind that any successful treatment we have now started out in a clinical trial.
      * Surgery and radiation are used in some cases. These treatments aren't used to cure the cancer. But they may help treat pain and other symptoms in areas where the cancer has spread.
      * Other drugs may also help treat some of the side effects of breast cancer treatment, such as nausea, fatigue, and infections.

  7. QUESTION:
    is sleeping alot normal with stage 4 cancer?
    My husband was diganosed with stage 4 cancer in heart,liver,lung,kidneys,brain,skin,bone,assending colon,scrotum and his color has not been good lately,very weak,and sleeps alot they only allowed him 10 days of radation n is on a chemo pill for the brain cancer,what is his survival rate with this

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I too am sorry to hear about your husband. I would imagine that with all his problems he is on a fairly high dose of pain killers. These drugs would cause sleepiness and are probably contributing a lot to his sleep. Yes, I do believe it is normal for someone at his stage to sleep so much.

      Good luck and best wishes to you both.

  8. QUESTION:
    Stage 3 B Lung Cancer?
    My grandpa was diagnosed with lung cancer and today the Dr finally told him he is stage 3 b and it is inoperable. He is to weak for surgery, he would die. So they are doing 4 weeks chemo/radiation followed by a 4 week break then back to another 4 weeks of chemo/radiation to try to beat this. They told him there is a 40% chance he can beat this and live but there are always risks with the treatment and he will get very sick. I do know how sick he will get as my step-mom is stage 4 treatments failed, my aunt is stage 4 and treatments failed. So my question is what is the survival rate for people with stage 3 B. He is 78 years old with other health issues including high blood pressure, liver problems (although the dr said it isn't cancer in the liver just liver aging), to much protein in his blood and diabetes so what is the chance he will beat this and live or at least live with it for awhile? My grandparents have been married over 50 years and my grandma said she thinks she will die first but it just seems like there is only a short time with both of them.

    • ANSWER:
      To be honest, and I hate to tell you this, but 40% sounds a little optomistic for stage 3b lung cancer. I think stastically its more like 20-25%.

      I think with treatments though, your Grandpa does have a good chance of living quite a few more years. As long as he responds to treatment, and the cancer does not advance.

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the survival rates of small cell lung cancer?
    My grandmother was just diagnosed and it has spread to her liver and her adrenal glands. Is this considered stage 4?

    • ANSWER:
      First off, I'm sorry to hear about your grandmother.

      Well, when it comes to small cell lung cancer, staging is a little different, its either limited stage or extensive stage, ie, just in the lungs, or has spread elsewhere.

      So, from what you said, she has extensive stage small cell, and the survival rate is probably around 1%. She would have to discuss her options with her oncologist, but with cancers with such a low survival rate, her best chance may be medications that are in clinical trials, though that would have to be a decision she would have to make, as some people dont want to be "guinea pigs" per say.

  10. QUESTION:
    Have you ever known someone who has suffered from non-breast and non-prostate cancer?
    A friend of mine (a young friend - she's in her early 20s) was diagnosed a couple of months ago with a form of sarcoma. When she was diagnosed, the cancer had already reached stage 4; her survival chances are low, and she's already gone through several dangerous complications which, even if she survives them, will leave her permanently crippled.

    Incidentally, she recognized the symptoms of this cancer nearly a year before she was diagnosed (she didn't recognize it as cancer, but had been in and out of doctor's offices for a year before one finally recognized it as sarcoma - and she's not the type to complain idly) - most of her previous doctors assumed it was some kind of back problem, and she had been sent to chiropractors a couple of times. It was finally recognized as cancer when it started to migrate near her breasts, where abnormal tissues started to serve as warning flags for doctors.

    Another family friend died a few years ago of lung cancer; it was also stage 4 when diagnosed. Incidentally, she was given extremely high survival rates when it was first diagnosed as breast cancer; these rates plummeted when her doctors realized that the mass was sitting a little further back than they first found.

    It seems that the medical community files cancer into about four categories: breast cancer, prostate cancer, "the patient's own fault" cancers (e.g. lung cancer and liver cancer, which are assumed to be caused by smoking or drinking, even if they aren't), and "other" cancers (which, not being as politically popular as breast cancer or prostate cancer, draw very little funding and attention from medical specialists). If you're unfortunate enough to have a type that's not breast or prostate cancer, your doctors either actively think you deserve to die, or they're just completely in the dark about diagnosing and treating your cancer.

    Has anyone else suffered losses from the politicization of cancer? Does it p*ss anyone else off that people with the wrong kind of cancer tend to have dismal chances of being diagnosed or treated properly, because cancer has become politicized so all the resources go to the types that can be used to help our little "boys vs. girls" fights?

    • ANSWER:
      Ive had family members die from liver cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, skin cancer, brain cancer and stomach cancer. Ive had family members that have survived breast cancer, cervical cancer and uterine cancer. Do I think these people were treated better? No, not really. These types of cancer are far more common and therefore have far more early detection tests in place. They were all in parts of the body that can be removed without killing the patient. Because I've been highly involved in the Relay for Life (American Cancer Society's signature event) for the past 8 years I have met people who have survived all sorts of cancer.

  11. QUESTION:
    Time frame for Esophageal Cancer?
    I know the survival rate is quite low as I have read online in many different places, but can someone tell me the average life expectancy from time of diagnosis... weeks, months, years, and what to expect.... given the circumstances that he's otherwise currently a quite healthy 47-50 y/o male. As it has only been days since knowledge, I am assuming he is in stage 4 as the cancer is also in the lungs, liver, and lymph-nodes. Please let me know what to expect, how ill will he get, etc etc. Thanks so much for any information.

    • ANSWER:
      Since diagnosis has been recent, there is absolutely no way of knowing this information. Much depends upon what type of treatment the patient undergoes, his individual response to the treatment, his overall health, the location of the tumors in the body (do they invade major organs or structures) and probably a good deal of luck. Stage 4 disease is the most difficult to treat . . but it can be treated successfully. There is not a cancer out there in any stage or tumor grade that someone, somewhere has not survived.

      So, the first thing you should do is not listen to statistics or prognosis. Concentrate on learning as much as you can about the disease. Do not be afraid to read all the material. Read as much as you can, ask the oncologists question, make sure you locate an oncologist that you thoroughly trust and is willing to go to bat for the patient. You also need to have an oncologist who is totally honest with you. It will be quite a fight, but it can be done.

      Here are some sites with resources, esophageal cancer support groups, and information about Esophageal Cancer.

      MedlinePlus: Esophageal Cancer
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/esophagealcancer.html

      NCI: Treatment for Esophageal Cancer
      http://www.cancer.gov/cancerinfo/pdq/treatment/esophageal/patient/

      American Cancer Society: What is cancer of the esophagus
      http://www.cancer.org/docroot/cri/content/cri_2_4_1x_what_is_esophagus_cancer_12.asp?sitearea=cri

      Esophageal Cancer Support Groups
      http://groups.msn.com/EsophgealCancerChatandSupport/

      Esophageal Cancers Discussion List
      http://listserv.acor.org/archives/ec-group.html

      Esophageal Cancer Education Foundation
      http://www.fightec.org/

      Good luck to you.

  12. QUESTION:
    Help with my Grandmother who's battling cancer for the 3rd time?
    I'm asking in this section because I'd really like to hear from some of my contacts on this one as its very close to my heart. My grandma (who I'm very close to) is battling stage 4 ovarian cancer, that's now transferred to her liver. She's gone through 3 bouts with it (of chemo) and come through each one, however none of us are hopeful this time around because she's frail and weak and tired. She's had a good run and beat the odds each time but this time her chances are about 15% survival rate. We've been so close all these years and I'm really struggling emotionally with this. I'm looking for advice from people who've lost a family member. Do you think she wants me to be overly positive or to be realistic in my approach that her chances this time around aren't that great? What's worse, complete denial or complete negativity? Any help on how to handle this would be greatly appreciated, I'm about to have a meltdown. I don't know whether to show my vulnerability to her or to be strong for her.
    Thank you everyone, these answers are really helping.

    • ANSWER:
      Ohh sweetheart, i'm so sorry about this!! The only thing you can do is to just tell her how much you love her and how much she means to you. Let her know that she is so loved and respected and you believe in her. Let her know that you are scared and upset though too.

      Good luck to her this time, please know that our prayers are with you, and your family!


Liver Cancer Survival Rate Stage 3

We Care Health Services Logo

Liver Transplant Hospitals In Mumbai

LIVER Transplant

Liver damage from cirrhosis cannot be reversed, but treatment can stop or delay further progression and reduce complications. Treatment depends on the cause of cirrhosis and any complications a person is experiencing. Regardless of the cause of cirrhosis, it is essential that every patient avoid all substances, habits and drugs that may further damage the liver or cause complications or liver failure.....

There have been over 60 different liver diseases treated with liver transplantation. However, there are several conditions that are more commonly treated with this procedure. They are frequently conditions that cause chronic or continuing liver inflammation. As the inflammation heals, fibrous tissue forms, much like a scar forms when a cut in the skin heals. Severe and advanced scarring of the liver is called Cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is not reversible and leads to end stage liver disease....

Live Donor Liver Transplant

Living liver donation Introduction : -

Liver donation is possible from a living donor who is a relative of the recipient who can donate half his/her liver. The donor operation is entirely safe and the half liver quickly regenerates in both the donor and the recipient in a few weeks. In the first few days after operation even when regeneration is not complete, the half liver is enough to maintain normal donor functions due to the immense reserve in the liver.....

Children's Liver Transplant

A liver transplant is recommended for children who have serious liver dysfunction and will not be able to live without having the liver replaced. The most common liver disease in children for which transplants are done is biliary atresia. Other diseases may include Alagille syndrome, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Wilson's disease, hepatitis, and hemochromatosis.....

Building on a Legacy of Innovation

We Care India partner hospital transplant teams are comprised of surgeons, medical specialists, nurse coordinators, social workers and ancillary staff members who provide superior, specialized expertise in all related transplant services. From careful pre-transplant monitoring to post-surgical care, Stanford's strong emphasis on continuous quality improvement creates better outcomes for transplant patients.

We Care India partner hospital has long been at the forefront of the field, home to both the first adult heart transplant in the US and the first heart-lung transplant in the world. The transplant programs at We Care India partner hospital have earned a number of distinctions in the field, including the #1 ranking in the country in both patient and graft survival for kidney transplant.....

At We Care India partner hospital, transplant unit was established in 1997 with a view to providing state-of-the-art tertiary level care and service in liver and renal transplantation......

Facilities and expertise available : -

  • Liver Transplantation for children and adults with acute and chronic liver failure /cirrhosis
  • Living related Liver transplant and Cadaveric transplant
  • Pediatric hepatology service including transplant and biliary surgery
  • Adult Hepatology and Gastroenterology
  • Renal Transplantation in adults and children including Lap Donor Nephrectomy
  • Complex vascular and peritoneal access procedures
  • Complex Hepatobiliary Surgery....

Hospitals in Mumbai, India

Hospitals in Mumbai have been historically popular with patients from South Asian & Middle East countries to India. Now, a growing number of people from the USA, Africa and Canada are also visiting Mumbai, India for Medical Tourism.

Primarily reason why Mumbai in India is now becoming such a popular medical tourism destination for the westerners is : -

  • High quality of private medical care
  • Low cost
  • English is widely spoken
  • Big pool of US & UK returned doctors & surgeons....

Other points in favor of India are : -

  • A peaceful democracy for last more than 50 years
  • Independent & mature legal system (although the proceedings are very slow)
  • A wide variety of tourism options.
  • Fixed medical treatment package price that is known in advance....

We Care India facilitates medical treatment to top Hospitals in India including wocld class hospitals in Mumbai. Major medical tourism promoting hospitals in Mumbai are Wockhardt Hospitals, Mulund, Mumbai, Saifee Hospital, Churni Road, Mumbai, Eye Solutions Eye Hospital, Mumbai, Dr. L.H. Hiranandani Hospital, Powai, Mumbai....

The list of Liver Transplant Hospitals in Mumbai is as follows : -

A ] Wockhardt Hospital, Mumbai

Wockhardt Hospitals, has become first super speciality hospital in South Asia to achieve accreditation from Joint Commission International (JCI), USA.

Wockhardt has associated with Harvard Medical International, USA, to bring you Wockhardt Hospitals, Mumbai. Wockhardt joined hands with the Government of Maharashtra to set up a 250 - bedded super-specialty hospital in Mumbai, with state-of-the-art surgical and Medicare facilities. With latest technology, multi-disciplinary capability, state of the art facilities, world class infrastructure and excellent patient care ambience and processes......

Please log on to : www.indiahospitaltour.com

Send your query : Get a Quote

We Care Core Values

We have a very simple business model that keeps you as the centre.

Having the industry's most elaborate and exclusive Patient Care and Clinical Coordination teams stationed at each partner hospital, we provide you the smoothest and seamless care ever imagined. With a ratio of one Patient Care Manager to five patients our patient care standards are unmatched across the sub continent.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Survival Rate? Colon Cancer, also 3 shadows on Liver, to be looked into later!?
    Colon Cancer: Surgery 9 days ago, removed 1 tumour @ 6 inches of colon/rectum and 25 lymph nodes, 15 found to containn cancer. Stage 3-C, Recovery within 2 days. Removed from IV in 3 days, removed catheter in 3 days, walking in 2 days, Released in 4 days.
    Pulse 128/68. constant, Temp 98* constant, heart rate 75 beats p/m. Great shape, healthy except for this.
    Morphine stopped on second day, aspirin only afterwards.
    Platelets at 56 - 67. 5 units of plasma and Vit. K injections. Received whole blood during operation.
    History, HCV for 35 years, Renal carcenomia 10 years ago, Pancreatitious 1 year ago, Family history, Father & grandfather died of Liver Cancer at age of 65 and 40 respectivally. Sister with Ovarian cancer.

    • ANSWER:

  2. QUESTION:
    Stage 3 B Lung Cancer?
    My grandpa was diagnosed with lung cancer and today the Dr finally told him he is stage 3 b and it is inoperable. He is to weak for surgery, he would die. So they are doing 4 weeks chemo/radiation followed by a 4 week break then back to another 4 weeks of chemo/radiation to try to beat this. They told him there is a 40% chance he can beat this and live but there are always risks with the treatment and he will get very sick. I do know how sick he will get as my step-mom is stage 4 treatments failed, my aunt is stage 4 and treatments failed. So my question is what is the survival rate for people with stage 3 B. He is 78 years old with other health issues including high blood pressure, liver problems (although the dr said it isn't cancer in the liver just liver aging), to much protein in his blood and diabetes so what is the chance he will beat this and live or at least live with it for awhile? My grandparents have been married over 50 years and my grandma said she thinks she will die first but it just seems like there is only a short time with both of them.

    • ANSWER:
      To be honest, and I hate to tell you this, but 40% sounds a little optomistic for stage 3b lung cancer. I think stastically its more like 20-25%.

      I think with treatments though, your Grandpa does have a good chance of living quite a few more years. As long as he responds to treatment, and the cancer does not advance.

  3. QUESTION:
    Help with my Grandmother who's battling cancer for the 3rd time?
    I'm asking in this section because I'd really like to hear from some of my contacts on this one as its very close to my heart. My grandma (who I'm very close to) is battling stage 4 ovarian cancer, that's now transferred to her liver. She's gone through 3 bouts with it (of chemo) and come through each one, however none of us are hopeful this time around because she's frail and weak and tired. She's had a good run and beat the odds each time but this time her chances are about 15% survival rate. We've been so close all these years and I'm really struggling emotionally with this. I'm looking for advice from people who've lost a family member. Do you think she wants me to be overly positive or to be realistic in my approach that her chances this time around aren't that great? What's worse, complete denial or complete negativity? Any help on how to handle this would be greatly appreciated, I'm about to have a meltdown. I don't know whether to show my vulnerability to her or to be strong for her.
    Thank you everyone, these answers are really helping.

    • ANSWER:
      Ohh sweetheart, i'm so sorry about this!! The only thing you can do is to just tell her how much you love her and how much she means to you. Let her know that she is so loved and respected and you believe in her. Let her know that you are scared and upset though too.

      Good luck to her this time, please know that our prayers are with you, and your family!

  4. QUESTION:
    What do you think of this article...was McCain being transparent when....?
    asked to release his medical records?

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/09/30/new-urgency-over-mccain-m_n_130298.html

    Specifically, here is an excerpt:

    Provided with only a scant review of the information, questions have begun to rise as to the danger of McCain's most recent bout with cancer. Bronow noted that there are two reports detailing the stage of McCain's latest (his fourth) bout with melanoma. One report put it at a stage 2a, which has a relatively high five-year survival rate; another put it at a stage 3b, which is much more dire in nature.

    "As a dermatologist, if I hear about a stage three melanoma, I say 'My God this guy is walking on nails here," said Bronow. "There is that much difference between a stage 2 and a stage 3."

    Asked to detail his notes, Gupta said the pathology report - which lists the size and other attributes of the cancer removed - indicated a stage 2a:

    "It was 2 centimeters across, 0.22 centimeters deep, and not ulcerated, which gives him a 66 percent survival rate over ten years. Melanoma is a particularly aggressive cancer. Mainly because skin is the largest organ in the body it can spread to the lungs, liver and the brain... Most of the occurrences will occur right away. I am reassured by the fact that it has been eight years now and there hasn't been a reemergence of that melanoma."

    Apparently none of the news stations will touch this subject...I cant imagine WHY.

    • ANSWER:
      With everything else that's gone on why should news like this be any more of a surprise than anything else?


Liver Cancer Survival Rate Australia

Breast cancer survival rate refers to the percentage of people with breast cancer who survive the disease for a specific period of time after diagnosis. Often, the statistics are based on a 5-year survival rate.

Survival rate refers to the percentage of people who are alive 5 years after being diagnosed with breast cancer. These people may still show few or no symptoms at all or they may be cured of the disease after the 5 years. It also refers to the percentage of people who are receiving treatment 5 years after they have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

The survival rate of breast cancer is based on a large group of people and cannot therefore be used to predict what may happen to an individual patient. Breast cancer survival rate for women under the age of 40 is slightly less than the survival rate for women above the age of 40.This can perhaps be attributed to the fact that patients under the age of 40 develop cancers that grow more aggressively. Women above age 40 have a survival rate of about 7% more than women below age 40.

The survival rate is also determined by whether the disease is localized or has spread or metastasized. According to the American Cancer Society, the survival rate for localized breast cancer is 98% while that of breast cancer that has spread is about 80%. Breast cancer survival rate may also be determined by the patient's response to treatment. Some patients respond faster than others.


Liver Cancer Survival Rate 2011

Ever since Dr. Thomas Starzl performed the first human liver transplant in 1963 thousands of people have added years to their lives because of the lifesaving procedure. According to the American Journal of Transplantation, recipients of liver transplant have increased odds of survival.

One study found that nearly 60% of those who receive a liver transplant survive for 15 years or more following the initial transplant. The liver is the only organ that can regenerate itself, meaning only a small amount can grow into a fully functioning liver.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, nearly 7,000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States, with nearly 16,000 people on waiting lists. The liver processes fats, proteins and carbohydrates and secrets necessary bile to help in the digestion process and breakdown toxic substances.

A study of more 5,000 liver transplant recipients found that more than 70% live for more than three years following the initial transplant. Nearly 95% of those 50 to 64 years of age survive for at least the first three months following the transplant.

Surprisingly, liver cancer only accounts for the reason why a person needs a liver transplant in 2% of those who received or are waiting for a transplant. Often the reason for a transplant is other conditions that have not originated in the liver, but effect it's functioning to the point where it does not work properly anymore.

According to the American Liver Foundation, follow up visits are required for liver transplant recipients once a year on the anniversary date of their transplant. Age is a factor in survival rates. One study reports a nearly 70% survival rate of ten years or more in transplant recipients under the age of 40.

The longest living person to have received a transplant has lived for nearly 30 years since his transplant. A recent study puts the one year survival rate of liver transplant recipients at nearly 80%. Advances in medicines used to suppress the immune system to prevent rejection are among reasons credited for longer survival rates.

Milliman, Inc., a group that does consulting for health insurance companies, puts the one year survival rate among transplant recipients at 77%. Regardless of which figures you go by, those who receive liver transplants are living longer today compared to even just a decade ago.

Ideally, it is best to try to do things to prevent the need for a liver transplant. This includes avoiding behaviors, such as heavy drinking, which may contribute to liver problems becoming severe enough to require a transplant.

There are many factors which may contribute to the need for a liver transplant, several of which are not the fault of the individual. Recently Apple's Steve Jobs received a liver transplant, reportedly because of Hepatitis C. The good news is that for those who do need a liver transplant, no mater what the reason, there is better chance of survival for many years following the initial transplant.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    seriously i need someone to talk to or im gunna go crazy?
    i have had a rough time since last year and it all trails up to here and now
    on january 6th(two days before his birthday) my boyfriend (since 4th grade im going to be in tenth for 2011-2012)was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, nearly 14 months later he was in a car accednt-a drunk driver rammed into the passenger side of his truck the drunk was thrown 20 feet and broke his back landing on a semi's hood(he deserved it)
    blew his left pupal hitting his head on the car's door and left him permintly parshily blind, got his face horribly cut up, lost his right arm(prity much lost it in the wreck)a good chunk of his left ear was cut off from glass, he was impaled with a metal rod and lost his appendix and impaled his lung when i finaly got to see him he was black and blue all over with a sickly greenish yellow tinge-he smiled at me but i could see how much pain he was in and he said go with her(wich made me confused)

    due to complications with his lungs and liver from the cancer and then loosing a lot of blood he died three days later

    my cousin died in an accident last summer-there was nothing anybody could do it just happened to him and that's all that matters hes dead and gone, never again am i to see his happy smilin face again his life was cut too short in an accident that we had no control over. he was crushed when his tractor flipped over on top of him wile mowing a ditch
    in my town im known for being a kindhearted animal lover, but quite fierce when it comes to protecting the ones i hold dear
    and then the most horrible part of it all
    on october 14, 2010 around 12:15 my older sister(who was living with my mom and me for a while) came bursting into my room(startling me out of a deep sleep) and said that i needed to get up and go outside
    i knew right away something was completely wrong because her face was way too slack and emotionless and she sounded almost like a panicked animal backed into a corner without anywhere to run or hide
    i flew out of bed, past her and outside to the front porch (we have about 24 cement steps leading down to a cement driveway) and at the bottom of the steps was my mother, lying on the ground unconscious
    my sister called an ambulance when she realized that mom wasn't responding to anything she did
    they said that the town ambulance was out on another call so they would call another from the nearest town, which was 7 miles away, not very far, only a couple of minutes away
    it took an agonizing 1 hour and 45 minutes for the ambulance to get to my house,
    which is in the middle of town(about 100 people) and it took about 30 minutes for a
    police officer to get to where i was
    it takes about an hour to get to the emergency room of the closest hospital
    the doctor said that my mom had severe brain injury and he said she had less than a 30%
    chance to make it
    the hospital we were at wasn't well enough equipped for brain injuries so they airlifted her to
    the main hospital in the state -which is in Kearney- almost four hours from where i live
    she had to have 4 brain surgeries
    1 to get all of the access blood off of her brain
    2 to take a piece of her scull out to relieve pressure
    3 the get more blood off of her brain
    4 to get her scull back in after the swelling went down and stabilized for a while
    after the first surgery my sister asked the new doctor what percentage she had of survival (sorry if i worded it confusingly) and the doctor asked what she heard from the last Doctor so she told him
    and when she said 30% he looked at her like she grew a second head, and then slowly said she actually has a LOT better than that because we get lots of brain injuries like this in a year and i would say the survival rate is really about 85%
    my mother was in a coma for over a month
    she was in rehab for a wile to get better (physically and mentally relearning stuff) around
    december she started getting weird infections in the incision on her head and last month
    they finally realized that the bone flap(skull) that they had stuck back in, had died
    she went into surgery to get it re removed and currently has to wear a helmet everywhere she goes due to the fact that she has no skull in that particular area
    in time she will get a replacement made out of plastic
    my mother is different in a lot of ways now compared to what she was, but i expected that
    she is no longer "mom" but that doesn't change the fact that im glad that i still have her alive and well, because "mom" or not i still love her the same and always will
    but i still do miss the way she was with every bit of my heart
    im a 16 year old girl with a lot of love and life ahead of her and i probably will have some pretty
    rough spots like this one, but hey, who doesnt
    shes been through h*ll and back and i find hope in the fact that she wakes up with a smile on her face and a ready and waiting 'i love you' every day
    and on top of it im in love with my bes

    • ANSWER:
      It does seem as if you've gone through a rough patch. I can't give you any cliche saying like "i know how it feels" because I really dont. Quite frankly it must suck. But the good thing is you've come on here and talked about it. and that is how you heal.

      You know...you are a strong person for dealing with this all along keeping your head on your shoulders. And I hope you know that. But if you can get thhrough this, i think you can get through anything. Try and take things just one day at a time. Think of all the good things that happen in a day...even if its as simple as five minutes in the sun.

      Life is about balance. In the end, the good is equal to the bad....

      i can tell that you'll have learned a lot from these experiences. You will always have that throughout life.

      While you'll come to miss the ones you lost. You can keep them alive in your heart. The memories are movies and your mind is a cinema...you can sit down and watch whenever you like. All of the good feelings that came from them can be revisited. They still happened.

      I mean i wish i could wave a wand and make it so everything didn't happen,. but life isn't a fairy tale and I'm no fairy god mother. I hope things get better for you soon. Please take care, thanks for sharing, and I'm wishing you well

      lots of big hugs from me xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

  2. QUESTION:
    Possibly have malignant tumor at 14... help please?
    I'm 14, just turned fourteen Feb. 26, 2011.
    I had my gallbladder out about May 9th, 2011.
    I had my appendix out March 17, 2011.
    I was diagnosed anemic April 2nd, 2011.
    I was diagnosed with peptic ulcers May 7, 2011.
    I was diagnosed with a hiatel hernia May 7th, 2011.
    A lot in less then 2 months right?
    I tested negative for hpylori which causes peptic ulcers.
    The next cause the doctors are looking at is a rare disorder called Zollinger Ellison Syndrome, which causes tumors the pancreas. two thirds of the tumors are malignant (cancerous), and can spread to my brain, neck, liver and nearby lymphnodes.
    If diagnosed I have about a 20% 5 year survival rate. I might have to take chemotherapy and radiation, if the tumors are inoperable.

    I know I might not have it, but I'm still freaking out. I've cried myself to sleep every night since I found out I might have it.

    I'm excited and very nervous about Tuesday, which is when I go down to Children's Hospital of Detroit and get tested.

    It doesn't ever leave my mind, and constantly worrying about it, is gonna make my already too high levels of acid in my stomach to go up. (Also, a side from tumors, you get high levels of acid.)

    Is there any way I can at least ATTEMPT to relax? Cancer is literally my BIGGEST fear, so thinking I might have a malignant tumor scares the crap outta me.

    The disorder is so rare, only 1% of Americans get it each YEAR.

    Does anyone have any information on it? It would help a bunch if you do.

    Thanks in Advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment for Zollinger-Ellison syndrome most often consists of medications to reduce stomach acid and heal the ulcers. Surgery to remove the tumors may be an option for some people with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Tumors may be on pancreas or duodenum or lymph nodes by the pancreas..

      They aren't always cancerous tumors. The tumors, if you have any, are usually small and is the cause of the acid increase.

      If it's severe, there are many treatment options, including liver transplant, if it's spread that far, or even removing your stomach or severing the nerves that promote acid secretion...


Liver Cancer Survival Rate Stage 1

We Care Health Services Logo

Liver Transplant Hospitals In Chennai

LIVER Transplant

Liver damage from cirrhosis cannot be reversed, but treatment can stop or delay further progression and reduce complications. Treatment depends on the cause of cirrhosis and any complications a person is experiencing. Regardless of the cause of cirrhosis, it is essential that every patient avoid all substances, habits and drugs that may further damage the liver or cause complications or liver failure.....

There have been over 60 different liver diseases treated with liver transplantation. However, there are several conditions that are more commonly treated with this procedure. They are frequently conditions that cause chronic or continuing liver inflammation. As the inflammation heals, fibrous tissue forms, much like a scar forms when a cut in the skin heals. Severe and advanced scarring of the liver is called Cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is not reversible and leads to end stage liver disease....

Live Donor Liver Transplant

Living liver donation Introduction : -

Liver donation is possible from a living donor who is a relative of the recipient who can donate half his/her liver. The donor operation is entirely safe and the half liver quickly regenerates in both the donor and the recipient in a few weeks. In the first few days after operation even when regeneration is not complete, the half liver is enough to maintain normal donor functions due to the immense reserve in the liver.....

Children's Liver Transplant

A liver transplant is recommended for children who have serious liver dysfunction and will not be able to live without having the liver replaced. The most common liver disease in children for which transplants are done is biliary atresia. Other diseases may include Alagille syndrome, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Wilson's disease, hepatitis, and hemochromatosis.....

Building on a Legacy of Innovation

We Care India partner hospital transplant teams are comprised of surgeons, medical specialists, nurse coordinators, social workers and ancillary staff members who provide superior, specialized expertise in all related transplant services. From careful pre-transplant monitoring to post-surgical care, Stanford's strong emphasis on continuous quality improvement creates better outcomes for transplant patients.

We Care India partner hospital has long been at the forefront of the field, home to both the first adult heart transplant in the US and the first heart-lung transplant in the world. The transplant programs at We Care India partner hospital have earned a number of distinctions in the field, including the #1 ranking in the country in both patient and graft survival for kidney transplant.....

At We Care India partner hospital, transplant unit was established in 1997 with a view to providing state-of-the-art tertiary level care and service in liver and renal transplantation......

Facilities and expertise available : -

  • Liver Transplantation for children and adults with acute and chronic liver failure /cirrhosis
  • Living related Liver transplant and Cadaveric transplant
  • Pediatric hepatology service including transplant and biliary surgery
  • Adult Hepatology and Gastroenterology
  • Renal Transplantation in adults and children including Lap Donor Nephrectomy
  • Complex vascular and peritoneal access procedures
  • Complex Hepatobiliary Surgery....

Hospitals in Chennai, India

An attractive destination for Medical Tourism: India is emerging as the most favoured destination for Health and Medical Tourism. The Indian Corporate hospitals are well equipped, proficient and could measure up to or even outshine any hospital in the west, making the nation an attractive destination.

Chennai (earlier known as Madras) in India is placed well for the international medical travelers seeking treatment / surgery at best hospital in India by most experienced surgeons. Being home to few of the most experienced doctors in India and the birthplace of the Apollo Hospitals, Chennai has few of the most comprehensive hospitals in India.

Chennai has few of the most comprehensive and medical tourism promoting hospitals of south India. Major medical tourism promoting hospitals in Chennai are Apollo Hospitals, Greams Road, Chennai, Apollo Specialty Cancer Hospital, Chennai, MIOT Hospital, Chennai and BGS Global Hospital Chennai. These hospitals have been accredited by national and international hospital accreditation bodies and are well equipped to take medical and personal care of International Patients....

The list of Liver Transplant Hospitals in Chennai is as follows : -

A ] Apollo Hospital, Chennai

Established as the first corporate hospital in 1983, Apollo Hospital, Chennai is now declared as a Centre of Excellence by the Government of India. The Apollo Hospital, Chennai is the first Indian hospital to introduce latest techniques in coronary angioplasty, stereo tactic radiotherapy and radio surgery for CNS tumors.

It is the first Indian Hospital to receive the ISO 9002 and ISO 14001 certifications. The hospital has over 1000 beds, several specialized clinics and many medical milestones to its credit.....

Please log on to : www.indiahospitaltour.com

Send your query : Get a Quote

We Care Core Values

We have a very simple business model that keeps you as the centre.

Having the industry's most elaborate and exclusive Patient Care and Clinical Coordination teams stationed at each partner hospital, we provide you the smoothest and seamless care ever imagined. With a ratio of one Patient Care Manager to five patients our patient care standards are unmatched across the sub continent.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Survival Rate? Colon Cancer, also 3 shadows on Liver, to be looked into later!?
    Colon Cancer: Surgery 9 days ago, removed 1 tumour @ 6 inches of colon/rectum and 25 lymph nodes, 15 found to containn cancer. Stage 3-C, Recovery within 2 days. Removed from IV in 3 days, removed catheter in 3 days, walking in 2 days, Released in 4 days.
    Pulse 128/68. constant, Temp 98* constant, heart rate 75 beats p/m. Great shape, healthy except for this.
    Morphine stopped on second day, aspirin only afterwards.
    Platelets at 56 - 67. 5 units of plasma and Vit. K injections. Received whole blood during operation.
    History, HCV for 35 years, Renal carcenomia 10 years ago, Pancreatitious 1 year ago, Family history, Father & grandfather died of Liver Cancer at age of 65 and 40 respectivally. Sister with Ovarian cancer.

    • ANSWER:

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the prognosis or 5 year survival rate of Stage IV colon cancer?
    My mom was diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer that has metastasized to her liver this week (I know, Merry Christmas, huh?). In my research, I am finding the survival rate at anywhere between 1-30% depending on the article and source. Is anyone wear of a reputable study with a reliable statistic?
    Sorry, I meant "aware," not "wear." My head isn't where it's supposed to be lately.
    They removed some tissue and are starting chemo. She's always been healthy and strong, rarely got sick. (which is why the diagnosis at this advanced stage was so surprising. She was asymptomatic until about 3 weeks ago). But she did smoke for years, but quit about 4 years ago.

    • ANSWER:
      The 5-year survival rate for stage 4 colon cancer is 5%. This means 5 years after diagnosis of stage 4 disease 5% are still alive.

  3. QUESTION:
    Cancer Survival Rate Question?
    My husband has stage 4 lung/liver cancer. I dont have the technical name but basically its lung cancer living inside his liver(along with two other types they couldnt identify or at least thats what they said). They could not be sure exactly where the origin was even tho the main cancer they found in his liver identifies as lung.

    He was told around 2 years with treatment. However, the chemo he was on his marrow couldnt tolerate so we had to stop. They had no other chemo meds they thought would be helpful or the like. So right now he is not being treated as they dont have a game plan really.

    Does anyone have a good website about survival rates for this type of cancer. He was told 2 yrs with treatment but that shifted to 1-2 yrs and now noones talking and since he cant do chemo and he
    was hit and miss with it as is once his platelets started dropping and not wanting to come back up...where does this leave us?

    I just want an idea for my own mental knowledge. Thank you for any help given!
    SUZE~because they dont know the origin radiology was out of the question. As for oral drugs they want to start him on something called Tarceva but he is very weary about taking it because of the side effects especially the bleeding part cuz his spleen is very enlarged.

    The original diagnosis was undefined small cell carcinoma. However, on the screen in the doctors office Ive seen the word A---carcinoma(word reminded me of arachnicarcinoma, cant recall the exact spelling)with unknown origin.
    Those are the only things I know about the specific name. During his sporatic chemo session and two sets of scans done there has been no real growth nor shrinkage. Its basically stayed the same with the exception of his spleen that keeps growing.

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry, but small cell lung cancer are aggressive and without treatment I would not expect him to survive more than 9 months or so.
      Please talk to his doctor about hospice he may not need it right now, but when he does you will not have to think about. They are great about answering your questions and managing pain. The time has come where you need to concentrate on the quality of the life he has left not the number of months.
      Best wishes.

      P.S.
      If he has 2 cancers the other one is probably adenocarcinoma.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate of a person with Stage 4 breast cancer who just suffered a stroke?
    A 48 year old woman, diagnosed on 12/4/08 with stage 4 breast cancer (mets to brain, lungs, liver and spine) suffered a stroke on 1/30/09, during a chemotherapy treatment. The stroke left her paralyzed on her left side, with limited mobility in her hand/arm/shoulder. She can't walk, and she has "mental mis-fires."

    Her family (particularly her mother) is in denial about the grimness of her condition. Her husband (they're somewhat estranged, but he is "doing the right thing") wants to put her in a rehab/hospice setting, because she can't climb stairs. (They live in an old rowhouse. . .no bathroom on the main floor.) Her mother, on the other hand, has come up with this crazy idea to rent an apartment and care for her there. ?????

    Does anyone have any experience with a situation like this? What is this woman's realistic survival rate? Would hospice be the appropriate move at this point?
    Her survival was said to be about 2 months, which it has already been. X-rays of lungs show that they are completely covered with cancer cells. The doctor has suggested hospice/rehab.
    . . .but her mother doesn't want that.
    Prairie Girl. . .I told them the very same thing, but was treated like I was nuts. My dad had a stroke, but survived 10 years afterwards. He was a total invalid. My mother insisted on caring for him at home. That lasted about two years, and took a huge toll on ALL of us, as we were required to chip in with his care. My brother (49) died of lung cancer that had metastasized to his brain, liver and bones. My sister just last year died of kidney failure at age 60. All three were in hospice at the end of there lives, as it was extremely difficult--physically, as well as emotionally--to care for them at home.

    Unfortunately, her mother does not respect anyone's opinion except her own. Thought "maybe it's me" for a minute.
    . . .and very sorry to hear about your Dad.

    • ANSWER:
      Stage 4 usually means a very limited time is left. Her mother loves her and wants to help her, but she isn't realizing how much care she's going to need. It would be better for her to be in Hospice and have her mother be there to enjoy the time they have left together. My dad had lung cancer and when they realized it had spread to his brain he only lived 6 more weeks. It's a very sad situation. Be there for your friend in any way you can, because your time together is limited.


Liver Cancer Survival Rate

Lance, as many of you know, was diagnosed ten years ago with testicular cancer that had spread to his lungs and brain. Cervical Cancer Survival Rates By Country He survived surgery and gruelling chemotherapy to come back and win the Tour de France, arguably the world's toughest cycle race. He won it not once, but 7 times in a row. Now that guy is a legend.

As for me, I am a back of the pack runner: slow and steady. I was never going to be running up the front with a double D cup chest size. I think even Lance would struggle should he have been so endowed.

I run not to win the race, but to celebrate life, living, and being alive. This is ironic really because after running for 5 hours you really do feel half-dead!

Seriously though, it is a real privilege to be here. There are so many other people who could have stood up and told their stories.

If you're like me, you feel that cancer is everywhere. Every day it seems someone new is diagnosed with some brand of cancer. And it's not a nice disease.

My good friend's brother in law has recently had a tumour removed from his neck. The surgery affected function in his left arm and the radiotherapy killed his saliva production. He finds it difficult to swallow and can't taste anything ever again. No more red wine, no more chocolate, no more Krispy Kremes. I guess the up side is that if you can't taste it, you won't have cravings for red wine, chocolate and Krispy Kremes.

Lung Cancer Secrets Revealed Click here

As for me, I was diagnosed with cervical cancer four days after my gorgeous husband Rob proposed. There I was - 35, first proposal, never been married, excited to get married, to start a family. Then the doctor says, "You have cervical cancer. You may need a hysterectomy."

I felt like I stepped in to the middle of a silent hurricane. There was a roar and a rage that spun my life in a direction I had never anticipated.

I had surgery - an operation called a radical trachelectomy - removal of the cervix. It is a very new procedure, reserved for young women who want to preserve their fertility and whose cancer has not spread. In theory I can still fall pregnant, though not without some careful management.

After surgery I lay on my hospital bed with tubes sticking out everywhere. The surgeon came in, sat down on the bed, and patted my knee. You know it's bad when a surgeon, usually clinical and dry to a fault, sits down and pats your knee. He told me they found cancer in one of the lymph nodes they removed. I was going to need four rounds of chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy, for those who have not experienced it, is no picnic. There are all sorts of chemicals they use to poison the cancer cells. My particular form of chemotherapy consisted of a 9am to 5pm experience. I had an hour of fluid dripped through my arm, and then a couple of hours of cysplatin -the drug - then another hour of fluid to help flush it through. Cysplatin, like many other chemotherapy drugs, is so toxic that the nurses put on protective eyewear, enormous rubber gloves, and a mask just to hook it up. And then this drips directly in to the vein.

People often ask me, "What was it like? What did the chemo experience feel like?" I tell them, imagine your worst hangover ever, and nothing you do makes it feel any better. Not drinking, not sleeping, not eating. And this lasts for ten days.

No doubt about it - cancer sucks.

In my mind, the worst bits of cancer are:

1. Being told you have it

2. Waiting for test results

3. The treatment itself

4. After treatment.

Once treatment was over, it was the strangest thing. As I walked through those electric sliding glass doors after my last round of chemo, I felt like I was wandering out in to a giant wilderness. What now? What next?

You don't ever really get an "all clear" after cancer. It is not like appendicitis where you have it out and it is all done. Instead you live and wait between checkups to see if the cancer has returned or not. Each check up is one step further away from the chance of recurrence. But there are no guarantees.

How do you live like this? How do people cope?

Really, you just go on. You live each moment as it happens.

However there are gifts in cancer too, strange as it may seem... Lance Armstrong says he would never regret having cancer for the gifts it gave him, how it helped him to grow as a person. I, too, discovered some unexpected gifts in my cancer journey.

These are the gifts I discovered through my cancer journey:

1. I have never felt so loved. I had so much support from my friends, colleagues, and family. People gave me books, CDs, movies, flowers, brought me soup, chocolate, and plenty of other goodies. I experienced a real tsunami of love. People around the world were praying for me, some I had never met. I felt connected and cherished.

However the gift was not that cancer caused love to flow; rather it was the realisation that this love had been around me all the time but I had been so busy, so focused on my narrow little life, that I did not feel open to it. Like a sledgehammer, cancer cracked open my awareness to giving and receiving an abundance of love. I feel it flow effortlessly in my life now.

2. Compassion. I gained a lot more compassion for people - you just never know what they have been through. My own doctor, the one who diagnosed my cancer, told me that she too had gone through the cancer merry-go-round. She was diagnosed 7 years ago with breast cancer. 3 weeks later her husband was diagnosed with liver cancer. He promptly died, leaving her with four kids to look after while undergoing chemotherapy.

I felt such a deep compassion for this woman who had hitherto just been a busy G.P. to me. I now treat every encounter with another person with a lot more grace and care. I approach them from a foundation of compassion. This is a much more gentle and peaceful way to engage with others.

Most important of all, I gained compassion for myself. I stopped judging myself so harshly, stopped trying to be perfect. I came to enjoy all the lumps, and bumps, and bits and boobs that before had caused me so much grief. I loved my body, my imperfections, because it was alive - I was alive.

3. In facing death, I learned about life. After round two of chemotherapy I lay on my bed, feeling dreadful, gazing out the window at the trees. I just wanted to hide under the doona, terrified of dying. I just wanted to hug my mummy and daddy.

Instead I started to notice the sunlight on the leaves, the blue of the sky, the rosellas on the grass. It was magic. And I realised that everywhere there was a compulsive and unrelenting push for life.

Miracles were everywhere: the birds looking for a meal, the kangaroos nibbling on grass, spiders in their webs, the miracle of a baby in the womb growing without any help at all - these miracles were happening without any conscious thought from any of us. I realised I was part of that. This unrelenting push for life was part of me too. We are all part of that.

I felt this realisation fill all the cells of my being. I felt peace descend upon me. I was part of this; I am part of this; we are all part of this life. No matter what happens to our bodies or to things around us, it will be ok because we are all part of this enormous surging river of life that is so beautiful and so amazing and so full of miracles.

And that was what cancer gave me - an awareness of the true nature of life itself.

I know there are some of you here tonight who are living with a cancer diagnosis and undergoing treatment. I know you are terrified. I was too. But whether you have cancer or not, none of us knows what is going to happen tomorrow, next week, or in five years from now. You can choose to live in fear, or you can choose to live in possibility and joy.

All any of us ever have is now, this moment - right here right now. And those moments are magic.

If you take a message away with you tonight, it's not that there is life after cancer, but that there is life. Make sure you live it.

lung cancer treatment breakthroughs Click here

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate for liver cancer?
    http://cancer.emedtv.com/liver-cancer/liver-cancer-survival-rates.html

    • ANSWER:
      Stats were on page two...

      Five-year relative survival rates for liver cancer by race and sex were:

      7.4 percent for white men
      10.6 percent for white women
      5.5 percent for black men
      4.6 percent for black women.

      Liver Cancer Survival Rates Based on Stage
      The stage of liver cancer plays a role in the liver cancer survival rate as well. Based on historical data:

      31 percent of liver cancer cases are diagnosed while the cancer is still confined to the primary site (localized stage)
      26 percent are diagnosed after the cancer has spread to regional lymph nodes or directly beyond the primary site
      22 percent are diagnosed after the cancer has already metastasized (distant stage)
      In 22 percent of cases, the staging information was unknown.

      The corresponding five-year relative liver cancer survival rates were:

      19.0 percent for localized
      6.6 percent for regional
      3.4 percent for distant
      3.3 percent for unstaged.

      ***From personal experience though, and I'm going to be completely honest because I would want someone to be honest to me...

      My dad had colon cancer that spread to his liver. Once it was in his liver it was a death sentence. If the cancer originates in the liver a transplant is possible, but if that is secondary it's only a matter of time. From diagnosis to death for my dad was around 18 months. But they found the cancer at stage 3 or 4, so it was already in its advanced stages.

      I hope that helps.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate of secondary liver cancer?
    My mom was diagnosed with breast cancer about 5 years ago and has just been diagnosed with secondary liver cancer. The doctors have started her on a course of Chemotherapy. But honestly i really need to know the truth, how likely is it that this cancer will kill her?
    I really hope for honest answers, thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Good answer by "Stacey-Marie J"
      This would be stage IV metastatic breast carcinoma to the liver.
      You must realize that these cancer cells have been in the liver for at least five years already.
      Those breast cancer cells spread to the liver before the primary breast carcinoma was initially treated.
      We do not know what the stage was at presentation.
      We don't know what adjuvant chemotherapy she may have received 5 years ago.
      We do not know the estrogen and progesterone receptors.
      We do not know the HER2/neu status>
      We don't even know your mother's age ! !
      Her doctors, who have all of this crucial personal information - are supposed to be explaining the prognosis for your mom and the family members who go with her for her medical oncology appointments.
      It is part of their job.
      Your job is to be with your mother when she has doctor visits - if at all possible.
      - - - -
      Here's the general or average five year survival for stage IV breast adenocarcinomas - 20%
      http://www.imaginis.com/breasthealth/staging.asp
      But these statistics are very rough and include people with less life threatening metastases - such as bone metastases.
      - - - -
      The honest answer is that stage IV breast carcinoma with liver metastases is not considered to be a curable disease in 2009 medicine
      - though some people do much better than we would expect according to the statistics. People are not statistics. Every person is different. Each is special.

  3. QUESTION:
    Survival rate for liver cancer?
    I just found out that a friend of mine has a liver cancer. which happen to grow on her liver within the pass 6 month. Doc stated that they are not sure if they will treated her with chemo theraphy, medication for surgery. Yet, no exact info given until he speak with the cancer doctor. I'm stress out very bad and was wondering what could possibly happen? Can it be cure?

    • ANSWER:
      Survival rates for liver cancer are very difficult to predict. Physicians tend to be very cautious about making prediction. Those people who have a "will to live" seem to defy the odds. The treatment makes a difference too.

      Generally, physicians have had very little training in nutrition and they tend to poo poo anything that is outside their area of experience and training. The chemo specialist tends to recommend chemo and the surgeon will tend to recommend surgery. You are pretty much on your own when it comes to nutrition, but most people don't give this enough consideration. I suggest you read up on cancer and nutrition for yourself and perhaps for the benefit of your friend. Please note that there may be some interaction between chemo treatments and diet, so tread carefully here. Meat may help neutralize some of the toxic effects of chemo, although generally, animal proteins promote the growth of cancers.

      The most solid research about nutrition and liver cancer has been done by a Professor at Cornell University. Over a period of 30 years, he has found strong correlations between cancer and casein (cow milk protein). Animal proteins tend to promote the growth of cancers.

  4. QUESTION:
    what is the survival rate for metastatic liver cancer? Is there any better treatments available?

    • ANSWER:
      The survival rate depends on what kind of cancer the person has, if there are multiple liver mets and if there are mets anywhere else.
      Any better treatments than what? If we don’t know what treatment they have had how do we know if there are better ones?

  5. QUESTION:
    My mom has stage 4 liver cancer shes 72 years old. she start treatment next week.What is the survival rate?
    She first was diagnosed with ovarian cancer 2 years ago and was successful with surgery and treatment.Now its 4th stage liver and a small spot on the abdomen. How should I prepare myself and my family? Thanks Concern Daughter

    • ANSWER:
      Very sorry to read and say stage 4 liver cancer is the terminal stage.
      All treatment options(Very limited) are just palliative and prognosis is poor.
      You and your family must develop mental strength to face inevitable outcome.
      In such cases Hospice care is highly recommended.

  6. QUESTION:
    Survival Rate? Colon Cancer, also 3 shadows on Liver, to be looked into later!?
    Colon Cancer: Surgery 9 days ago, removed 1 tumour @ 6 inches of colon/rectum and 25 lymph nodes, 15 found to containn cancer. Stage 3-C, Recovery within 2 days. Removed from IV in 3 days, removed catheter in 3 days, walking in 2 days, Released in 4 days.
    Pulse 128/68. constant, Temp 98* constant, heart rate 75 beats p/m. Great shape, healthy except for this.
    Morphine stopped on second day, aspirin only afterwards.
    Platelets at 56 - 67. 5 units of plasma and Vit. K injections. Received whole blood during operation.
    History, HCV for 35 years, Renal carcenomia 10 years ago, Pancreatitious 1 year ago, Family history, Father & grandfather died of Liver Cancer at age of 65 and 40 respectivally. Sister with Ovarian cancer.

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    Cancer Survival Rate Question?
    My husband has stage 4 lung/liver cancer. I dont have the technical name but basically its lung cancer living inside his liver(along with two other types they couldnt identify or at least thats what they said). They could not be sure exactly where the origin was even tho the main cancer they found in his liver identifies as lung.

    He was told around 2 years with treatment. However, the chemo he was on his marrow couldnt tolerate so we had to stop. They had no other chemo meds they thought would be helpful or the like. So right now he is not being treated as they dont have a game plan really.

    Does anyone have a good website about survival rates for this type of cancer. He was told 2 yrs with treatment but that shifted to 1-2 yrs and now noones talking and since he cant do chemo and he
    was hit and miss with it as is once his platelets started dropping and not wanting to come back up...where does this leave us?

    I just want an idea for my own mental knowledge. Thank you for any help given!
    SUZE~because they dont know the origin radiology was out of the question. As for oral drugs they want to start him on something called Tarceva but he is very weary about taking it because of the side effects especially the bleeding part cuz his spleen is very enlarged.

    The original diagnosis was undefined small cell carcinoma. However, on the screen in the doctors office Ive seen the word A---carcinoma(word reminded me of arachnicarcinoma, cant recall the exact spelling)with unknown origin.
    Those are the only things I know about the specific name. During his sporatic chemo session and two sets of scans done there has been no real growth nor shrinkage. Its basically stayed the same with the exception of his spleen that keeps growing.

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry, but small cell lung cancer are aggressive and without treatment I would not expect him to survive more than 9 months or so.
      Please talk to his doctor about hospice he may not need it right now, but when he does you will not have to think about. They are great about answering your questions and managing pain. The time has come where you need to concentrate on the quality of the life he has left not the number of months.
      Best wishes.

      P.S.
      If he has 2 cancers the other one is probably adenocarcinoma.

  8. QUESTION:
    Does any one know if a liver transplant is possible if you have liver cancer and what the survival rates are.?
    Bladder cancer cells that chemo does not work as well orther cells and that have travelled to the liver and turned in to secondary liver cancer. How successful is chemo on these cells and how long can it increase survival.

    • ANSWER:
      It all depends on the extent of the disease. If the cancer is a primary liver cancer which hasn't spread to regional lymp nodes or distant site (metastases - commonly lung/brain/bone) then it is possible to resect the tumour which can lead to good survival provided the resection margins are clear. This doesn't involve a whole transplant just the removal of the affected area and is usually accompanied by chemotherapy.

      If the liver tumour is a metastases itself - most commonly from bowel cancer, again it is possible to resect up to 80% of liver tissue and still have good function and survuval is approx 33% at 5 years - this is provided the original bowel cancer has been proven to be cured and there are no metastases elsewhere in the body.

      As for a whole liver transplant for a whole organ infected with cancer... The chance of this occuring in isolation is actually rare, the cancer would have to be extremeally advanced to have affected the whole liver whilst not having been detected at an earlier stage when a selective resection could take place. If the cancer was this advanced then the chances of NOT having cancer spread to the lungs/brain/bone whould be tiny and so you wouldn't be able to remove the liver as it would be a futile procedure.

      Also liver transplants are difficult and bloody operations involving the blood vessels that drain and supply the liver itself. During the operation liver cells can leak into the blood stream. If the liver was riddled with cancer these cells would simply travel elsewhere and therefore negate the benefit of the procedure in the first instance. (because the cancer would not have been completely removed)

      I'm not sure on the stats for chemo though - sorry

  9. QUESTION:
    what is the survival rate of colon cancer patients with metastases to the liver?

    • ANSWER:
      1-5% 5 year survival

  10. QUESTION:
    What is the survival for liver cancer?
    A relative of mine was diagnosed with liver cancer recently and had been told that it was growing inside of him for about 6 months. for reassurance sake, could anybody please tell me the rate of survival ??
    He was also diagnosed with a rare form of it :(

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure if Casey understands the statistics.

      While liver cancer is not high on the list for cause of death, it has a high mortality rate for those diagnosed. Few patients survive more than 5 years.

      The statistics are improving, in the early 1970's only about 5% of patients survived 5 years from diagnosis, now about 15% survive 5 years.

      Even at this improved statistic this is a poor prognosis.

  11. QUESTION:
    survival rate when lung cancer has spread to bones liver and brain?

    • ANSWER:
      My dear mother passed away June 4th of lung cancer. She found out on her birthday in February. It had spread to the brain, stomach, lymph nodes. As someone else stated, once it gets to the brain, it can go farly quickly. She had three weeks of radiation on the brain. It didn't shrink it, but it didn't get bigger. But it still spread in the brain the doctor said. The brain controls their hunger and she just wouldn't even eat enough to keep a bird alive. We tried everything. The feeding tube was not even an option. All she wanted to do was sleep. She also had 2 rounds of chemo. If it hadn't been to the brain, she would still be with us for longer. She didn't have it in the liver.

  12. QUESTION:
    what is the survival (rate) for pancreatic cancer with metastasis to liver?

    • ANSWER:
      doesn't sound good. unfortunately the survival rate for pancreatic cancer is very low especially if it is getting to the liver.

  13. QUESTION:
    Survival rate for cancer that has spread to a part of liver?
    My brother was operated for Bile duct cancer in Jan 09" and his Bile duct, duodenum was removed. there was a Biopsy done after the operation and the area was found to be clean. My brother visited the doctor's office every month for regular checkup and he seemed to be recovering fast (the doctor did not order any further tests surprisingly). In october, he complained about pain in his upper abdomen and seemed to be losing wait. The doctor nowordered tests and found that there was metastatis in parts of the lever and pancreas. The doctor has recommended six chemo sessions. My brother is just 30 years old. I spoke to him very recently over phone and he seemd to be in the best of spirits and said that he has no sign of any discomfort except for some fleeting pain in upper abdomen. Please, let me know of any cases similar to this , what are chances of his survival?

    • ANSWER:
      If it was not cured on surgery it isn’t curable. Patient’s with liver invasion have a median survival of 1-3 years.

  14. QUESTION:
    what is ther survival rate for pancreatic cancer patients that have had the cancer spread to kidneys and liver?
    my nan who is in her 80's has just been diagonised with pancreatic cancer yesterday has spread i think it may have also spread to the brain. any info would be great.

    thanks.
    i seen her today she is not dead but i would like to know has she only got afew days i love my nan and sont get to see her very often.
    she has given up and i feel the end is near so does she unfortuantly she was upset when the doc said to her that she does not have long left the cancer is very large and u can feel it she has lost a maasive amount of weight wont eat or anything. it is very sad time for us all.

    • ANSWER:
      My mom (83 years old) was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer too. Hers had already spread as well. She was told she had 3 months to live, but made it to 4 months. Even the Dr's don't know how long she has left. Several times we were told the end was near, and the next day mom would be up and about. We found with my mom that she got weaker and weaker, until she kept falling trying to get out of bed. When this happened, she just gave up and died a couple of days later.

      Just spend as much time as possible with her. My mom really enjoyed looking at old pictures.

      Edit. I am so sorry. My mom weighed less than 50 pounds when she passed. When the eating and drinking stop the end is near.

  15. QUESTION:
    Breat Cancer Survival Rate?
    I know absolutley nothing about the type, the size, the stage, if its matasticized, etc. etc. etc.

    All I know is my mother is 44, stressed all the time, in otherwise good health other than being VERY SLIGHTLY overweight [she's got a big bum and thighs, thats it], works in retail, and half of her brothers and sisters have had cancer [9 siblings], both her parents had cancer, all different types as well> Cervical, lung, throat, breast, liver, skin. She doesn't drink other than at christmas with her sisters, she smokes regularly, she only has one kid [me], she is divorced and not dating, at all, she sleeps a lot, has chronic bronchitis [I cannot spell at the moment for some reason], barely eats, has small breasts, uhm....

    I have no clue what is relevant so I'm just including anything that could POSSIBLY help.

    Has trouble sleeping and takes sleeping pills regularly, hasn't gone to a gynecologist or had a mamogram since I was born [18 years ago], and she didn't notice the lump until our cat jumped on it and it started hurting a lot.

    So yea... If you guys could please give me some information on survival rates. I already know that because she is over 40, her chances are a lot better.

    I don't want to know any specifics about the Tumour sizes and palpable nodes and etc. etc. etc.

    If you could just tell me what her chances are, and how anything that I've told you could affect her chances.

    Thank you all so much in advance, this means a lot to me.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry DIS.AR.RAY I know you are worried about your mom and I am not trying to give you a hard time, but this is like asking if a car you are interested in is a good car and all you tell us is that it has four tires, two doors and it is blue. It is impossible to give you a meaningful answer.

      None of the things you mentioned, other than her age, is relevant to answering you. However, the things you do not want to know are. To give you a meaningful answer we need to know the stage, grade and her hormone receptor status. These things determine her treatment and her prognosis.

      About the only thing I can tell you is that you are correct that it is good she is over 40 rather than under 40, but it would be better if she were over 50. We have come a very long way in being able to manage breast cancer, so even if she has a later stage cancer the chances are very good that she will be around for quite awhile.

  16. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate for someone with stage 4 ovarian cancer which has spread to the brain, she is 84?
    my gran has been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, which has spread to liver, lung and brain, she is not been given any treatment and is being kept comfortable. Could anyone advise on what we can expect, i really don't want her to suffer.

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry. It is so difficult to watch and wait while someone you love goes through this.

      Each case is different, so no one can say for sure "how long". My sister made it 6 weeks after the cancer was found to have spread to her brain. She slept a lot and didn't eat much. At first, when she was awake she was quite alert, but toward the end, she was out of it most of the time.

      The medication that my sister was given for pain must have been quite effective, because she didn't complain of discomfort nor were there any indications that she was in any distress. She finally simply went to sleep and didn't wake up.

      God bless you and your family...

  17. QUESTION:
    what are survival rates when colon cancer matasticizing in the liver?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately,this has a bad prognosis.Since the cancer has spread to the liver,it would be a stage 4.The 5 yr survival rate is less than 3%.Once again,everybody is different and this is just a statistic.

  18. QUESTION:
    metastatic colon cancer to liver- does anyone know growth rates if unresectable?
    I have liver cancer that may be inoperable and have read about new drugs which might shrink the tumor but I wonder what the growth rate might be if just left alone ie how much time do I have. Any ideas or general answers would help me get a feel for whether i need to spend big bucks trying to shrink but with no real chance of increasing survival rate or just leave alone

    • ANSWER:
      The first answer is right. The growth rate depends on several things, including how well differentiated your cancer cells are. The more poorly differentiated, the faster the cancer spreads, usually. In general, cancer in your liver seems to spread rapidly because the liver is a very vascular organ. However, chemotherapy can curb this. Listen, there are a couple different chemotherapy regimens for colon cancer with minimal side effects. Don't you think it's worth a shot? you only live once. If you hate it, you can quit.

  19. QUESTION:
    What is the prognosis or 5 year survival rate of Stage IV colon cancer?
    My mom was diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer that has metastasized to her liver this week (I know, Merry Christmas, huh?). In my research, I am finding the survival rate at anywhere between 1-30% depending on the article and source. Is anyone wear of a reputable study with a reliable statistic?
    Sorry, I meant "aware," not "wear." My head isn't where it's supposed to be lately.
    They removed some tissue and are starting chemo. She's always been healthy and strong, rarely got sick. (which is why the diagnosis at this advanced stage was so surprising. She was asymptomatic until about 3 weeks ago). But she did smoke for years, but quit about 4 years ago.

    • ANSWER:
      The 5-year survival rate for stage 4 colon cancer is 5%. This means 5 years after diagnosis of stage 4 disease 5% are still alive.

  20. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate of a person with Stage 4 breast cancer who just suffered a stroke?
    A 48 year old woman, diagnosed on 12/4/08 with stage 4 breast cancer (mets to brain, lungs, liver and spine) suffered a stroke on 1/30/09, during a chemotherapy treatment. The stroke left her paralyzed on her left side, with limited mobility in her hand/arm/shoulder. She can't walk, and she has "mental mis-fires."

    Her family (particularly her mother) is in denial about the grimness of her condition. Her husband (they're somewhat estranged, but he is "doing the right thing") wants to put her in a rehab/hospice setting, because she can't climb stairs. (They live in an old rowhouse. . .no bathroom on the main floor.) Her mother, on the other hand, has come up with this crazy idea to rent an apartment and care for her there. ?????

    Does anyone have any experience with a situation like this? What is this woman's realistic survival rate? Would hospice be the appropriate move at this point?
    Her survival was said to be about 2 months, which it has already been. X-rays of lungs show that they are completely covered with cancer cells. The doctor has suggested hospice/rehab.
    . . .but her mother doesn't want that.
    Prairie Girl. . .I told them the very same thing, but was treated like I was nuts. My dad had a stroke, but survived 10 years afterwards. He was a total invalid. My mother insisted on caring for him at home. That lasted about two years, and took a huge toll on ALL of us, as we were required to chip in with his care. My brother (49) died of lung cancer that had metastasized to his brain, liver and bones. My sister just last year died of kidney failure at age 60. All three were in hospice at the end of there lives, as it was extremely difficult--physically, as well as emotionally--to care for them at home.

    Unfortunately, her mother does not respect anyone's opinion except her own. Thought "maybe it's me" for a minute.
    . . .and very sorry to hear about your Dad.

    • ANSWER:
      Stage 4 usually means a very limited time is left. Her mother loves her and wants to help her, but she isn't realizing how much care she's going to need. It would be better for her to be in Hospice and have her mother be there to enjoy the time they have left together. My dad had lung cancer and when they realized it had spread to his brain he only lived 6 more weeks. It's a very sad situation. Be there for your friend in any way you can, because your time together is limited.

  21. QUESTION:
    is there any treatment for liver cancer in india in any therapy or anyother alternative?
    one of my nearest has been detected liver cancer recently. please advise me if anyone knows its permanent treatment and advise me whether it is curable. If not what is the maximum survival rate of such patient

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on the amount the cancer has spread. It also depends on the availablity on a possible donor who might be able to donate part of their liver. The liver is one of those organs that a person does not have to be dead to donate. A portion of a liver can be implanted and the patient and the donor will both regrow what is missing.
      Unfortunately, the liver is tied into many parts of the body such as the lymphatic system. This gives the cancer a lot of opportunity to spread. The first order of business would be a round of chemotherapy to reduce the size of the cancer and attempt to kill off any possible spread of the cancer. There comes a balance though between treating the cancer and staying healthy enough for a transplant. If the patient becomes too weak from the chemo then operating is not an option until they become stronger. There are treatments that increase the red blood cell count that can make a patient stronger though that you can use during chemo to keep them healthy enough for surgery.
      Discuss all options with your doctors.
      If at all possible, the best cancer treatment center I know of is in the United States in Houston, Texas. MD Anderson specializes in creating 'cancer survivors'.

  22. QUESTION:
    Why are some cancer so deadly and others so easy to treat ?
    Why is liver cancer , stomach cancer ,kidney cancer ,skin cancer so much easer to treat than pancratic cancer ,lung cancer and brain cancer that is very deadly and little survival rate.

    • ANSWER:
      It all depends on how much tissue from organs you can sacrifice. In the brain for example, you can sacrifice very little.

  23. QUESTION:
    What are the survival rates of small cell lung cancer?
    My grandmother was just diagnosed and it has spread to her liver and her adrenal glands. Is this considered stage 4?

    • ANSWER:
      First off, I'm sorry to hear about your grandmother.

      Well, when it comes to small cell lung cancer, staging is a little different, its either limited stage or extensive stage, ie, just in the lungs, or has spread elsewhere.

      So, from what you said, she has extensive stage small cell, and the survival rate is probably around 1%. She would have to discuss her options with her oncologist, but with cancers with such a low survival rate, her best chance may be medications that are in clinical trials, though that would have to be a decision she would have to make, as some people dont want to be "guinea pigs" per say.

  24. QUESTION:
    symptoms of liver cancer?
    we think someone has liver cancer and i want to just check symptoms etc. The results are coming tomorow so we have been to a doctor but was just wodnering. The symptoms she has is yellowish skin, vomiting (given tablets to stop), pain near liver, loss of apetitie and a constant stomach ache. Also what are the survival rates .. she is around 65. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Pain near liver usually not happens in cancer .it favors liver infection or inflammation (hepatitis) .complete tests and sonography can decide if is cancerous or not .Cancer of liver carries poor prognosis

  25. QUESTION:
    liver and lung cancer?
    Somebody close to me has been diagnosed with Liver and lung cancer. As yet I do not know which is the secondary cancer or much about it. I do feel I have to know the survival rate. can anybody give me information on the survival rate please .This has come about in a matter of weeks. We thought he had a bad bout of flu.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello there.. how sad.. I know what you are going through... My mother has just been diagnosed with advanced stage 4 lung cancer which has spread to the lining of the Lungs and Lymph nodes and now Liver. The Dr wouldnt confirm life expectancy as they said they don't know as it is different for evvery patient. But we later saw the Cancer specialist and she confirmed 6-12 months with Chemo. As the Cancer has metastisised (spread) she couldnt have radiotherapy just Chemo and the chemo just provides pain relief and tests have show that it also prolongs life. it was a massive shock and is still very difficult but some people go out to work and never come home! at least we have this special time to show our mother how much we love her and to spoil and look after her. Life is never going to be the same for us again and I am sad when I think of the time when she will no longer be here. I have even taped her voice so that I can play it when she is no longer here! I am going to miss her greatly. Good luck. XX

  26. QUESTION:
    I had bloodwork done to check why my liver enzymes were showing as high...and the results are in. ?
    Everything came back normal (cholesterol, lupus testing, hepatitis, etc.) and my liver enzymes are showing as 242 and the other liver test is showing as 131. I am so scared becaue as of right now, they dont know why this is. I am going on Tuesday to get a Sonogram and I might possibly have tohave a liver biopsy taken if they cant find the results from the sonogram. I am really scared because after doing my internet related research today on other possible liver conditions or disorders, I turned up the search result on liver cancer and saw the survival rates/mortality rates even if a liver transplant is done. The chances are NOT good for those who develop primary liver cancer (cancer that starts in the liver and dosent spread to the liver from another location) and I also have been having pain in my stomach where my liver is located. I am seriously scared and all I can do is pray that this isnt the case; that it is something else. Please, if you have any idea what this could be BESIDES cancer...I would appreciate insight to calm my mind for now. Thank you so much and God Bless.
    Thanks for all the answers.

    I do not drink, at least hardly at all! I haven't drank a single beer or had any form of alcohol in a couple of weeks. Also, I was tested for diabetes and hepatitis and everything else as well and it all came back negative. Fatty liver - I will need to look into that. Yes that is me in the pic - I am 24. I am definetly not obese either. I just pray everything will come out ok!! Thank you all!

    • ANSWER:
      The most common cause of elevated liver enzymes is a fatty liver. is that you in the picture? You look very young, it would be HIGHLY unlikely for this to be C of the liver. The most common cause of fatty liver is alcohol abuse, do you drink much? Another cause could be acute infection of viral Hepatitis A or B, but you said that has been ruled out. Has there ever been any instance of any toxic overdose? The other two causes of a fatty liver are obesity and diabetes, but the latter would have almost certainly been ruled out with blood work you had done. You'll have to wait till you get the results of the scan, don't trawl the internet trying to diagnose yourself, don't put yourself through that emotional turmoil, just relax, wait and see what the sonogram reveals, it is least likely to be cancer.

  27. QUESTION:
    Lung cancer, Brain Cancer, Liver Cancer, Bone cancer?
    whats the survival rate on that after chemo and radiation? plaese let me know...
    stage 4 cancer....

    • ANSWER:
      Survival rates are based on the stage of the disease not the treatment. So you need to say what stage these cancers are.

  28. QUESTION:
    Bile Duct cancer!! what are the survival rates please?
    My dad has it and it has spread to his liver, he is having an op on Thursday to remove affected parts, I think they would not bother with the op unless the survival rate is good, would you agree??

    • ANSWER:
      These are questions you should be asking the oncologist and surgeon. Cancer treatment is dependent upon the stage of the disease, a patients age and overall health. Since you mention that it has spread to the liver, than your father is dealing with metastatic or what is referred to as stage IV cancer. Staging has more to do with the type of treatment to give a patient than it does prognosis.

      You should be reading as much as possible about this disease and the types of treatment options available.

      ACS: What is Bile Duct cancer?
      http://www.cancer.org/docroot/cri/content/cri_2_4_1x_what_is_bile_duct_cancer_69.asp

      NCI: Bile Duct Cancer
      http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/bileduct/

      NCCN: Physician Guidelines for Treatment of Hepatobiliary Cancers
      http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/PDF/hepatobiliary.pdf

      You might find information at a support group:

      Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation
      http://www.cholangiocarcinoma.org/

  29. QUESTION:
    Embryonic Sarcoma of the Liver?
    A family friend is thirteen years old and has embryonic sarcoma of the liver, stage three. Anyone who knows anything about this kind of cancer/treatment/survival rate; please make a comment. Anything would be helpful and appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure what type of tumour you are referring to-there is a specific tumour of the liver in children called 'undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UES)'. Is it this one?

      If so, treatment is usually by surgical resection-the surgeon would try and remove as much of the liver as possible. It is extremely rare, and unfortunately is quite difficult to treat.Patients get chemotherapy and radiotherapy before and after surgery, and treatment is aimed at stopping any distant spread.

  30. QUESTION:
    Am I the only person who thinks breast cancer walks are overrated?
    Why does it seem like once a year, a group of feminists come out of their kitchens and basements. And act as if they are being oppressed and that they are actually making a difference.

    Well I'm being a little pessimistic, but honestly, breast cancer has a 85% survival rate after 5 years. And it comes in 5th in terms of highest death toll amongst cancer (With lung cancer of course coming in 1st with a total of 1.3 million deaths per year (almost 3 times as many as breast cancer)).

    But my real question is, why do all these (I really hate to use this word) feminists walk for breast cancer, just because it usually kills women? Why can't there be a walk for lung cancer? or stomach cancer? even liver cancer has a higher death toll than breast cancer, so why breast cancer?
    Tamarack: I told you i was being pessimistic. Don't take what i said out of context.

    lo_mcg: Thanks for the facts and the links, but honestly, tl;dr. If it makes any difference to you, you would have been 2nd in line for first place.

    Denisedd: "It's because of their hard work that you can use better survival rates for your point of view." -facepalm- breast cancer treatment hasn't changed as a result of these breast cancer walks. The only difference now is that it can be treated with better technology, and no, the 5% of the total fundraising from the breast cancer walk didn't exactly help in getting these technologies. REAL funding did.

    • ANSWER:
      You are correct that it is just one of many cancers and not the most deadly at that.
      When the money goes to the American Cancer Society, I wonder how much is used to actually help patients. The salaries of the executives in the ACS are far higher than I ever made as a cancer specialist doctor taking care of women with breast cancers - often at my own expense for those who had no insurance. The ACS never helped any of my patients with their expenses going through costly treatments in the 1980's and 1990's, and we did ask for their help. I don't believe any of the high paid executives of the ACS ever stayed up all night taking care of people with breast cancer or any other maligant disease. I also doubt they had 13 years of expensive training before they obtained their lucrative executive positions. But, I may be wrong. Perhaps some of these executives were practicing doctors at one time. I would gladly be corrected if someone knows if any ACS executives are doctors with training and experience.

      From Wiki : "In 1995, the Arizona chapter of the American Cancer Society was targeted for its extremely high overhead. Two economists, James Bennett and Thomas DiLorenzo, issued a report analyzing the chapter's own financial statements and demonstrating that it uses about 95% of its donations for paying salaries and other overhead costs, resulting in a 22 to 1 ratio of overhead to actual money spent on the cause. The report also found that the Arizona chapter's annual report had grossly misrepresented the amount of money spent on patient services, inflating it by more than a factor of 10. The American Cancer Society responded by alleging that the two economists issuing the report were working for and receiving pay-offs from the tobacco industry, but did not offer any evidence to support these claims.
      Long before the problem with overhead in the Arizona chapter was exposed, the decentralized nature of the ACS was pointed to as a problem in cutting down overhead costs in local branches: central managers have little control over local chapters, which are run by independent boards, and are reluctant to pressure the boards as they receive funding from the local chapters. The ACS did move from New York City to Atlanta to reduce overhead costs of the central part of the organization."

      I suggest donating money to local hospice organizations rather than the ACS. At least that donated money is then used locally.

  31. QUESTION:
    JUST HAD NEICE DIAGNOSED WITH ADENOMA CARCINOMA IN STOMACH, SMALL INTESTINES AND COLON, WHAT IS THE SURVIVAL R?
    my neice was just diagnosed with adenoma carcinoma, stomach, small intestine and spots on her colon, has not spread to her liver yet, planning to have surgery next week, just found out 2 days ago, what is the survival rate of this cancer

    • ANSWER:
      As Denisedds says, it is not good if this is a primary stomach (gastric) carcinoma.
      We do not have the details of this case. We don't even know her age.
      [The age is so important when people ask questions on this site.]
      Sometimes you have to think of other possibilities - like an ovarian carcinoma which has spread to these areas. It is thinking outside the box - rare but possible
      I might check a CA125 blood test for an ovarian primary unless the gastroenteroligst who saw the stomach lesion via endoscopy and the pathologist who looked at the biopsy slides were certain this was a primary gastric carcinoma.
      Ovarian adenocarcinoma responds much better to chemotherapy than gastric cancer.

      You will have a better idea after the surgery next week.
      I suggest you plan to be there when the surgeon comes out of surgery and explains the findings to the family.
      The surgeon and the medical oncologist who have all the details of this case should be explaining the prognosis.

  32. QUESTION:
    Have you ever known someone who has suffered from non-breast and non-prostate cancer?
    A friend of mine (a young friend - she's in her early 20s) was diagnosed a couple of months ago with a form of sarcoma. When she was diagnosed, the cancer had already reached stage 4; her survival chances are low, and she's already gone through several dangerous complications which, even if she survives them, will leave her permanently crippled.

    Incidentally, she recognized the symptoms of this cancer nearly a year before she was diagnosed (she didn't recognize it as cancer, but had been in and out of doctor's offices for a year before one finally recognized it as sarcoma - and she's not the type to complain idly) - most of her previous doctors assumed it was some kind of back problem, and she had been sent to chiropractors a couple of times. It was finally recognized as cancer when it started to migrate near her breasts, where abnormal tissues started to serve as warning flags for doctors.

    Another family friend died a few years ago of lung cancer; it was also stage 4 when diagnosed. Incidentally, she was given extremely high survival rates when it was first diagnosed as breast cancer; these rates plummeted when her doctors realized that the mass was sitting a little further back than they first found.

    It seems that the medical community files cancer into about four categories: breast cancer, prostate cancer, "the patient's own fault" cancers (e.g. lung cancer and liver cancer, which are assumed to be caused by smoking or drinking, even if they aren't), and "other" cancers (which, not being as politically popular as breast cancer or prostate cancer, draw very little funding and attention from medical specialists). If you're unfortunate enough to have a type that's not breast or prostate cancer, your doctors either actively think you deserve to die, or they're just completely in the dark about diagnosing and treating your cancer.

    Has anyone else suffered losses from the politicization of cancer? Does it p*ss anyone else off that people with the wrong kind of cancer tend to have dismal chances of being diagnosed or treated properly, because cancer has become politicized so all the resources go to the types that can be used to help our little "boys vs. girls" fights?

    • ANSWER:
      Ive had family members die from liver cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, skin cancer, brain cancer and stomach cancer. Ive had family members that have survived breast cancer, cervical cancer and uterine cancer. Do I think these people were treated better? No, not really. These types of cancer are far more common and therefore have far more early detection tests in place. They were all in parts of the body that can be removed without killing the patient. Because I've been highly involved in the Relay for Life (American Cancer Society's signature event) for the past 8 years I have met people who have survived all sorts of cancer.

  33. QUESTION:
    is sleeping alot normal with stage 4 cancer?
    My husband was diganosed with stage 4 cancer in heart,liver,lung,kidneys,brain,skin,bone,assending colon,scrotum and his color has not been good lately,very weak,and sleeps alot they only allowed him 10 days of radation n is on a chemo pill for the brain cancer,what is his survival rate with this

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I too am sorry to hear about your husband. I would imagine that with all his problems he is on a fairly high dose of pain killers. These drugs would cause sleepiness and are probably contributing a lot to his sleep. Yes, I do believe it is normal for someone at his stage to sleep so much.

      Good luck and best wishes to you both.

  34. QUESTION:
    Can you survive stage 4 breast cancer?
    I just found out that my aunt has moved up to stage 4 breast cancer that has spread to her liver, lymnode, leg, neck etc. I don't know much about cancer and all I really want to know is what is the survival rate when you've reached stage 4? The doctors plan on Chemo therapy.

    • ANSWER:
      Stage 4 breast cancer has spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes to other parts of the body.

      In stage IV breast cancer, the cancer has spread elsewhere in the body. Affected areas may include the bones, brain, lungs, or liver. Because multiple areas may be involved, focused treatments like surgery or radiation alone are not sufficient. So far, treatment of stage IV breast cancer does not provide a cure for the disease. By shrinking the cancer, treatment can slow down the disease, make you feel better, and let you live longer. Although patients with stage IV breast cancer may live for years, it is usually life-threatening at some point. Many factors influence this

      * Chemotherapy , or treatment with cancer drugs, is often the main treatment. It can slow down the growth of the cancer. Chemotherapy is often used in combination with hormone therapy or immunotherapy.
      * Hormone therapy can be key for women with hormone receptor-positive cancers. These are cancers that need hormones to grow. Tamoxifen has been used to block the effects of estrogen for decades. But newer drugs, like the aromatase inhibitors Arimidex and Femara, and the aromatase inactivator Aromasin, also show great promise. They reduce the amount of estrogen your body makes. By cutting off the supply of estrogen, you can choke the cancer and slow it down. Women who haven't reached menopause may consider having their ovaries removed to stop them from making hormones that help cancer grow.
      * Biological therapy is a new approach. In about 25% of women with breast cancer, an excess of a protein known as HER2 makes the cancer spread quickly. Herceptin is a new drug that's been approved to treat women with metastatic breast cancer that is HER2-positive. It stops this protein from making the cancer cells grow. It may also boost your immune system, giving it the strength to fight the cancer itself. It is most often used in combination with chemotherapy.
      * Clinical trials are open to many women with stage IV cancer. A clinical trial may allow you access to cutting-edge treatments. Many new therapies -- new drugs, new treatments, and new combinations -- are in clinical trials now. Keep in mind that any successful treatment we have now started out in a clinical trial.
      * Surgery and radiation are used in some cases. These treatments aren't used to cure the cancer. But they may help treat pain and other symptoms in areas where the cancer has spread.
      * Other drugs may also help treat some of the side effects of breast cancer treatment, such as nausea, fatigue, and infections.

  35. QUESTION:
    could some one read over my speech about cancer? and tell me if it's any good? thankyu.?
    Slip on a shirt, slop on some sunscreen and slap on a hat. Says Sid the cancer council seagull. Although this slogan is commonly used across our nation every summer, There is not enough education about sun safety through out our schools.

    Melanoma is a form of skin cancer. The most deadliest and rapid moving cancer of them all. The first sign of melanoma is usually a new spot or an existing mole or freckle that changes in appearance.

    Some of the changes might be that the spot may grow larger. The edges of the spot may look irregular rather than smooth. The spot may be mottled with a range of colours such as brown, black, blue, red, white or light grey. The spot may be itchy or may bleed.

    It's recommended that you go straight to the doctors when you notice the signs, every few months especially the warmer ones you should get all your moles and freckles checked just to be on the safe side.

    People with fair skin are at higher risk of developing melanoma than those with darker skin. but it is no substitute for sunscreen and adequate protective clothing. During the summer, a long sleeve top, A wide brim hat, Spf 15+ sunscreen, and protective sunglasses are suitable during the scorching summer temperatures.

    “Between 11 and 3, stay under a tree, the best sunscreen of all is absolutely free.” This statement is not true, because even during the coldest times of the year, you can still get sun burnt. And not only that, UV Rays are not the only thing that causes cancer, Tanning booths and Pollution can trigger melanomas.

    Although there are several causes of cancer, There are also many many myths about cancer. I’m sure a majority of you have heard that putting your mobile phone down your shirt or under your pillow of a night, causes cancer. Not true, I can assure you of that.
    There is no proven study of any kind. Standing too close to your microwave while it’s cooking food causes cancer, Again, Rubbish, The only way you could possibly get cancer from your microwave is if the seal broke around it and radiation leaked out from it. Myth number 3).

    Household bug sprays cause cancer, Sleeping with an underwire bra causes cancer, Photocopying a body part causes cancer, applying sunscreen once a day will keep you safe from UV rays, You can’t get burnt when you’re in the snow. Not one of these statements are true.

    I recently had a personal experience with melanoma, I watched my friend go through a grueling death. Which only took 6 weeks from diagnosis to kill her. I buried a friend of 18 years in which melanoma was discovered in her left arm, and with many so called “successful operations” she was deemed clear of the disease but only one month later, the melanoma had shot up into her liver, which had rapidly caused her demise.

    Painfully killing her within 6 weeks. It was an awful experience to witness, The lady was in significant pain which could only be controlled by morphine. The tumour on her liver was so massive that it looked like she was having twins, but the rest of her body had withered away.

    Leaving the image of a prisoner of war. I can’t believe how aggressive this disease is,no amount of pain killers could stop her pain. And the amazing down hill fall in 2 days was astonishing. She couldn’t eat, Couldn’t sleep.

    Couldn’t walk, She was so weak that she was in and out of conscience Her mouth was so dehydrated, her lips were cracked, and her tongue looked like an 100 year old cockatoo’s tongue.

    Cancer research has come such a long way in the past 2 decades. When you were diagnosed with cancer back then, I was like almost a death sentence. But now with cancer research and treatments, such as radiology and chemotherapy and certain medications, a lot can be cured it’s just when it reaches the vital organs, ie. Liver, lungs, bowel, the survival rate drops dramatically,

    A lot of people these days who have passed on from cancer, their families request that donations to the cancer council are made in lieu of flowers, so more money can be put in to research. Instead of money being wasted on flowers and dying like their loved ones.

    The remarkable thing about this is that she had been to the doctors about a suspicious lump in her arm attached to a freckle. This went undiagnosed. So to anyone out there, don’t be afraid to get a second opinion, or 3rd if you are unsatisfied. If you have any enquiries call the cancer council now, 13 11 20. This is dedicated to my friend Anne Wesner, rest in peace.

    _--------------------------

    Keep in mind, i'm 15. anything i should add? please answer
    nah, she was 50. my mum knew her for 18 years. so i knew her my whole life

    • ANSWER:
      i'm a two time AML Leukemia survivor. You have my stamp of approval. I know how you feel about loosing good friends. I lost two. It's tough to watch someone slowly die. God bless her soul.

  36. QUESTION:
    Lung Cancer? How long to live?
    My grandpa is 78 years old. Friday night he started throwing up blood. Saturday morning they discovered a mass in his lung and sent him to a hospital known for treating cancer patients saying it was probably cancer. Today we were informed that it is lung cancer although they didn't tell us what stage it is in yet. He is still throwing up blood, having trouble breathing and lost a lot of weight. His liver is going bad although they aren't sure at this point if that is because of the cancer or not. This question is for those that have had someone you know go through this or medical professionals who know about these things or anyone else who may have info. What is the survival rate for these situations? How long given age, liver condition and lung cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      My mother died of lung & liver cancer She lasted 4 1/2 months after diagnosis
      Im sorry but the survival rate for this cancer & his condition is poor.
      Be with grandpa as much as you can now.

  37. QUESTION:
    Stage 3 B Lung Cancer?
    My grandpa was diagnosed with lung cancer and today the Dr finally told him he is stage 3 b and it is inoperable. He is to weak for surgery, he would die. So they are doing 4 weeks chemo/radiation followed by a 4 week break then back to another 4 weeks of chemo/radiation to try to beat this. They told him there is a 40% chance he can beat this and live but there are always risks with the treatment and he will get very sick. I do know how sick he will get as my step-mom is stage 4 treatments failed, my aunt is stage 4 and treatments failed. So my question is what is the survival rate for people with stage 3 B. He is 78 years old with other health issues including high blood pressure, liver problems (although the dr said it isn't cancer in the liver just liver aging), to much protein in his blood and diabetes so what is the chance he will beat this and live or at least live with it for awhile? My grandparents have been married over 50 years and my grandma said she thinks she will die first but it just seems like there is only a short time with both of them.

    • ANSWER:
      To be honest, and I hate to tell you this, but 40% sounds a little optomistic for stage 3b lung cancer. I think stastically its more like 20-25%.

      I think with treatments though, your Grandpa does have a good chance of living quite a few more years. As long as he responds to treatment, and the cancer does not advance.

  38. QUESTION:
    Time frame for Esophageal Cancer?
    I know the survival rate is quite low as I have read online in many different places, but can someone tell me the average life expectancy from time of diagnosis... weeks, months, years, and what to expect.... given the circumstances that he's otherwise currently a quite healthy 47-50 y/o male. As it has only been days since knowledge, I am assuming he is in stage 4 as the cancer is also in the lungs, liver, and lymph-nodes. Please let me know what to expect, how ill will he get, etc etc. Thanks so much for any information.

    • ANSWER:
      Since diagnosis has been recent, there is absolutely no way of knowing this information. Much depends upon what type of treatment the patient undergoes, his individual response to the treatment, his overall health, the location of the tumors in the body (do they invade major organs or structures) and probably a good deal of luck. Stage 4 disease is the most difficult to treat . . but it can be treated successfully. There is not a cancer out there in any stage or tumor grade that someone, somewhere has not survived.

      So, the first thing you should do is not listen to statistics or prognosis. Concentrate on learning as much as you can about the disease. Do not be afraid to read all the material. Read as much as you can, ask the oncologists question, make sure you locate an oncologist that you thoroughly trust and is willing to go to bat for the patient. You also need to have an oncologist who is totally honest with you. It will be quite a fight, but it can be done.

      Here are some sites with resources, esophageal cancer support groups, and information about Esophageal Cancer.

      MedlinePlus: Esophageal Cancer
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/esophagealcancer.html

      NCI: Treatment for Esophageal Cancer
      http://www.cancer.gov/cancerinfo/pdq/treatment/esophageal/patient/

      American Cancer Society: What is cancer of the esophagus
      http://www.cancer.org/docroot/cri/content/cri_2_4_1x_what_is_esophagus_cancer_12.asp?sitearea=cri

      Esophageal Cancer Support Groups
      http://groups.msn.com/EsophgealCancerChatandSupport/

      Esophageal Cancers Discussion List
      http://listserv.acor.org/archives/ec-group.html

      Esophageal Cancer Education Foundation
      http://www.fightec.org/

      Good luck to you.

  39. QUESTION:
    Which of these four examples best depict how Obamacare will destroy our health system in the US?
    Example 1:
    The Nobel Prizes in medicine and physiology have been awarded to more Americans than to researchers in all other countries combined.
    (With government taking over and nationalizing the incentive for new research will be all but non-existent under Obamacare)

    Example 2:
    Eight of the 10 top-selling drugs in the world were developed by U.S. companies.
    (With Obamacare there will be less of a financial incentive to develop more drug breakthroughs)

    Example 3:
    The U.S. has some of the highest breast, colon and prostate cancer survival rates in the world. And our country ranks first or second in the world in kidney transplants, liver transplants, heart transplants, total knee replacements, coronary artery bypass, and percutaneous coronary interventions.
    (These will all dramatically decrease as it takes longer to be seen by a primary care provider now that everyone (included illegal immigrants are allowed to cut in line before you) to be seen.

    Example 4:
    We have the shortest waiting time for nonemergency surgery in the world; England has one of the longest. In Canada, a country of 35 million citizens, 1 million patients now wait for surgery and another million wait to see specialists.
    (Obamacare will make people wait forever to be seen and likely many will die simply waiting to be seen)

    • ANSWER:
      prekin writes: "1. Since there is no public option, gov't is not 'taking over and nationalizing' - that's a complete lie"

      This is laughable. When there was a public option, the liberals were telling us that a public option was not a government takeover. It was an increase in competition, the liberals said. Now we have an admission that it did indeed mean a government take over.

      Whatever. Even without a public option, the government is STILL be taking over and nationalizing our health care system. There are many ways to do it. Public oprtion wasnt the only way.

      arunmada writes: "NONE of the examples you stated proove our health coverage is superior to other nations"

      How about this. America is number one in the world in cancer survival:

      http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/secondhandsmoke/2009/07/21/most-cancer-survival-rates-in-usa-better-than-europe-and-canada/

      "just our medical care, which 30 million people don't have access to"

      Lie. Everyone has access to medical care. The number you cite is not the number of people who dont have access to medical care, but the number of people who dont have medical insurance (which as it tunrs out is a mostly bogus number)

      "and which causes 40,000 deaths annually"

      Lie.

      "2,200 worthy to note are Veterans"

      Who have access to the VA. Ask them how good the health care there is.

      "Sure our medical care is superb, but our system to access it is inefficient"

      Lie.

      "All evil Obama's plan is doing is trying to regulate insurance companies so that everyone has coverage"

      He's trying to do more than that. He's using the heavy hand of government in an unconstitutional way to dictate to private businesses how to conduct business. In this he is ordering them to just give away their store in such a manner that it would be impossible for them to operate,

      "Think of it this way, just because South Africa mines the most diamonds doesn't mean everyone has diamonds in South Africa, Glenn Beck logic=Fail."

      This is because south Africa has a socialist economy. And if south Africa mandated the mining companies to give away everybody in South Africa free diamonds, how long before those mining companies wil lgo out of business?

      "Our current system is Socialist."

      Yes it is. And THATS the problem. Making it even more socialist isnt going to solve anything. Its only going to make it worse.

      "Did you know you are paying for every one of those 30 million uninsured people who wind up in the hospital and can't pay right on the spot?"

      Actually, no. Many of those who are uninsured wind up paying out of pocket or get private charities to pay their medical bills. There are some who we pay for, but the bill Obama wants, isnt going to get us to pay for our own instead of for 30 million (or whatever the true number is). We're gonna wind up paying for 300 million insured people.

  40. QUESTION:
    hypacellular carson noma my mother has it. stomach stared swelling, dr has to drain stomach. any survivers tha?
    my 60 year old mother has liver cancer diagnoise may 6, good christian woman. i have read survival rate is slim to none, can anyone tell me if they have been through this = she has blood clots in main blood supply and cant have surgery. any help will be appreciated good or bad

    • ANSWER:
      I am not a survivor but my dad was. He lived for almost 2 years after he was told he had a max of 6 months to live. The good thing is that they can deliver chemo directly to the liver, so the chemo does not have to go thru the blood stream. My daddy's tumor was the size of a softball, he did swell. Unfortunatly there is not a good survival rate, but their lives can be prolonged with the right drugs.
      I am so sorry
      Lots of hugs and prayers

  41. QUESTION:
    Question about Adrenal Cancer?
    Okay, so yesterday I got a call that my best friend was found to have aggressive adrenal cancer, I'm not sure if there was a tumor found, or what. But the cancer has already spread to her liver, and it's not looking good. Does anyone out there have a survival rate, or a treatment option that has proved most effective for them? I can take it, I just can't seem to find any consistencies in my research, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you..

    • ANSWER:
      These are fairly rare cancers and don’t have the best outcomes I’m afraid. Untreated the median survival is 3 months, with treatment it can be as much as 5 years depending on the extent of the disease. She needs to have surgery to remove as much of it as possible as soon as possible.

  42. QUESTION:
    Help with my Grandmother who's battling cancer for the 3rd time?
    I'm asking in this section because I'd really like to hear from some of my contacts on this one as its very close to my heart. My grandma (who I'm very close to) is battling stage 4 ovarian cancer, that's now transferred to her liver. She's gone through 3 bouts with it (of chemo) and come through each one, however none of us are hopeful this time around because she's frail and weak and tired. She's had a good run and beat the odds each time but this time her chances are about 15% survival rate. We've been so close all these years and I'm really struggling emotionally with this. I'm looking for advice from people who've lost a family member. Do you think she wants me to be overly positive or to be realistic in my approach that her chances this time around aren't that great? What's worse, complete denial or complete negativity? Any help on how to handle this would be greatly appreciated, I'm about to have a meltdown. I don't know whether to show my vulnerability to her or to be strong for her.
    Thank you everyone, these answers are really helping.

    • ANSWER:
      Ohh sweetheart, i'm so sorry about this!! The only thing you can do is to just tell her how much you love her and how much she means to you. Let her know that she is so loved and respected and you believe in her. Let her know that you are scared and upset though too.

      Good luck to her this time, please know that our prayers are with you, and your family!

  43. QUESTION:
    My step-mother has recently been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer?
    it was found before she had any symptoms during a check on her liver (which is perfectly healthy) and therefore she has not had any symptoms. Does anyone know anything about survival rates etc when the symptoms havent shown yet? I have read a lot on the internet about this type of cancer but it is usually only found because of symptoms and by then it is too late. Am I kidding myself that she may have chance since they found it before symptoms? Waiting for scan results to see if it has spread. any info is much appreciated. xxx

    • ANSWER:
      There are several important factors here that should be considered, and questions that should be addressed to the doctor in charge of your mother.

      Where is the tumour in the anatomy of the pancreas? If it was found incidentally during liver tests, i would presume that it was either an USS or a CT scan. Being assymptomatic, would be inclined to say that the tumour would be in the body or the tail of the pancreas as opposed to the uncinate process, peri-ampullary, head or neck of the pancreas. The reason for this is that whilst small pancreatic tumours can often not be seen on USS or CT, signs of a dilated biliary tree often are, which would normally have led to some degree of symptoms.

      What were the symptoms that caused the liver investigations? The pattern of the LFT's, if they are raised, and which ones, could have led to the investigation, but often these tests can be a sign of trouble in the head of the pancreas, or the bile ducts. That is not to cause alarm, but just to see if she had any problems with her liver, deposits from the pancreatic tumour or any other problems.

      If it is in the tail of the pancreas, and there is no spread to the liver, then it is possible that the tumour may be resectable. If she hasn't already, they will perform a CT scan, which will visualise the pancreas in more detail, and the tumours position in relation to adjacent vascular structures. More commonly, and EUS (Endoscopic Ultrasound) will be performed to better assess the lesion and ensure it is not invading any structures. It is also possible to take biopsies of the pancreas at this point, in order to obtain a 100% conclusive diagnosis of the cancer, most commonly adenocarcinoma, but sometimes neuroendocrine (with better survival rates)

      Even if the tumour is in the head or neck of the pancreas, if the CT shows it to be small and potentially resectable, then again, EUS will be needed to assess operability and obtain tissue diagnosis. If it was in this region, and she did develop symptoms, such as jaundice, caused by the tumour blocking the bile flow into the duodenum, then an ERCP or PTC may be needed to insert a small tube, known as a stent, to relieve these symptoms. This does not mean the tumour has become inoperable.

      The reason pancreatic cancer has such a poor general survival is partly it's aggressive aetiology, but also the number of vascular structures in and around the pancreas, especially the head. SMA and V (Superior Mesenteric artery and vein) splenic vein and artery, IVC (inferior vena cava)....the list is long. If these are involved then the tumour will be inoperable.

      Assuming that she is in the minority of patients, (around 10-15%) who are surgically operable, she will most likely have one of two operations. pancreatic tail neoplasms can sometimes be removed by distal pancreatectomy, and often accompanying splenectomy, but sometimes will require a whipples. This is the case for all pancreatic head cancers that are operable. The operation is very big. It takes around 6-7 hours on average and will require a stay in intensive care immediately after. It has risks, but they depend on the assessment the clinician gives your mother and aren't standard, but they will be significant. The whipples operation is the shortened term for a pancreatico-duodenectomy. This involves removing a cuff of stomach and the pyloric sphincter, some small bowel, and also the pancreas, or at least the head of. It can be carried out without removing the pylorus in some cases, which is known as a pylorus preserving panc...

      Survival rates after this are around 10-15% after 5 years.

      If she is not operable, then treatment will involve either the previously mentioned stenting, with the potential for chemotherapy. Standard chemotherapy is Gemcitabine, which has been shown to have a good response in around a third of patients, this being improved in the GEMCAP study, which adds cepacitabine, although NHS provision for this is patchy and may need private care.

      Feel free to e-mail me any questions if i can be of use.

  44. QUESTION:
    My Dad's Cancer.. What May Happen?
    3 weeks ago my dad went to the hospital feeling sick to his stomach. They kept him in for 2 weeks and found out that his liver was blocked off so he was becoming jaundice, they done a operation to put a stint in side him. Found out that he has pancreatic cancer as well, and that it has spread to the liver and parts of his stomach as well. They are unable to perform a surgery which they sometimes perform in ppl with pancreatic cancer, because it would go all thru his body due to having his liver blocked off. I am wondering what are the survival rates or if there is even any hope of him making it very long. I go visit him everyday and find it just so hard to accept because he is acting so normal, but i know things are not normal, i do not let him see me hurt and feeling down though because i wanna keep his mood up so he can be around long as possible but i hear that pancreatic cancer is one of the harshest forms, and especially worse now that it is in 3 parts of his body.

    • ANSWER:
      My Dad was diagnosed last November with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. It spread to his liver. He was given 6-8 months to live, and that was 11 months ago. He's still holding on and living life. His tumors have doubled in size and it breaks my heart to know that soon enough, he may not be with us anymore. For more information on pancreatic cancer, go to www.carepages.com and search the name "Jerry Bierhoff." That's my Dad's page, and we post updates about his dr's appointments and health. It might help to educate yourself as much as possible on this. It helped me. If you need support, feel free to e mail me @ BrookeBierhoff@yahoo.com

      The whipple procedure is always too late to perform after the cancer has spread to other organs. My Dad recently had the stint put next to his liver as well. I know what you're going through. Remember: There's plenty of time to be sad. Take advantage of the time you have with your Dad now and save the sadness for later.

  45. QUESTION:
    Anyone know much about Colon cancer? Is it curable? Help please.?
    I just found out my dad has it today, the doctors just found out recently. Apparently it's not early it started developing 5 years ago. It's spreading and it's on 2/3rds of his liver. Anyone know an estimate how long he has left to live? Or the survival rates?
    I'm not a troll. O_O and he avoids going to the doctors which is why we just found out. he just started getting pain recently (the last couple weeks) he just got a colonoscopy last week which was when we found out.

    • ANSWER:
      my poppa is recovering from bowel (colon) cancer. we found out probably 8 months ago now because he was urinating blood. at first they couldn't figure out why but with several tests they soon found the problem. before the doctors found the cancer, one morning when he came back from his run he had pain in his appendix, my nanna called the ambulance and we found out he had an appendices, the next day they removed it because it was on the verge of busting and it was so big he could have died. with doing tests on the appendix this is when they found the cancer and that it had spread to the bowel. he was extremely lucky that they caught it early and when he had his operation they removed all the lymph nodes. the surgery was very successful and he had 3 months of chemo to be on the safe side. throughout the whole time my poppa was extremely lucky, he did not lose any hair from the chemo but he did get some nasty rashes and red blotches on his arms which are now healing. yesterday he had his final test to see if he had the all clear and we are just waiting on the results.

      since your fathers cancer started developing 5 years ago in that time it could have spreaded throughout the lymph nodes. if so im not sure if there is a certain amount of time he has left. but if its spreaded 2/3 of his liver that cant be good. the sooner you find it the better chances of survival. colon cancer is the most curable IF it hasn't spreaded to the lymph nodes, if it has then it can go anywhere in the body.

      i wish you the very best, i sincerely mean that. i know what a tough time you are going through and i hope they can help your father.
      goodluck xx

  46. QUESTION:
    i need an extra two minutes on my speech about melanoma? can someone read it and help me add anything?
    Slip on a shirt, slop on some sunscreen and slap on a hat. Says Sid the cancer council seagull. Although this slogan is commonly used across our nation every summer, There is not enough education about sun safety through out our schools.

    Melanoma is a form of skin cancer. The most deadliest and rapid moving cancer of them all. The first sign of melanoma is usually a new spot or an existing mole or freckle that changes in appearance.

    Some of the changes might be that the spot may grow larger. The edges of the spot may look irregular rather than smooth. The spot may be mottled with a range of colours such as brown, black, blue, red, white or light grey. The spot may be itchy or may bleed.

    It's recommended that you go straight to the doctors when you notice the signs, every few months especially the warmer ones you should get all your moles and freckles checked just to be on the safe side.

    People with fair skin are at higher risk of developing melanoma than those with darker skin. but it is no substitute for sunscreen and adequate protective clothing. During the summer, a long sleeve top, A wide brim hat, Spf 15+ sunscreen, and protective sunglasses are suitable during the scorching summer temperatures.

    “Between 11 and 3, stay under a tree, the best sunscreen of all is absolutely free.” This statement is not true, because even during the coldest times of the year, you can still get sun burnt. And not only that, UV Rays are not the only thing that causes cancer, Tanning booths and Pollution can trigger melanomas.

    Although there are several causes of cancer, There are also many many myths about cancer. I’m sure a majority of you have heard that putting your mobile phone down your shirt or under your pillow of a night, causes cancer. Not true, I can assure you of that.
    Standing too close to your microwave while it’s cooking food causes cancer, Again, Rubbish, The only way you could possibly get cancer from your microwave is if the seal broke around it and radiation leaked out from it. Myth number 3).

    Household bug sprays cause cancer, Sleeping with an underwire bra causes cancer, Photocopying a body part causes cancer, applying sunscreen once a day will keep you safe from UV rays, You can’t get burnt when you’re in the snow. Not one of these statements are true.

    I recently had a personal experience with melanoma, I watched my friend go through a grueling death. Which only took 6 weeks from diagnosis to kill her. I buried a friend of 15 years in which melanoma was discovered in her left arm, and with many so called “successful operations” she was deemed clear of the disease but only one month later, the melanoma had shot up into her liver, which had rapidly caused her demise.

    Painfully killing her within 6 weeks. It was an awful experience to witness, The lady was in significant pain which could only be controlled by morphine. The tumor on her liver was so massive that it looked like she was having twins, but the rest of her body had withered away.

    Leaving the image of a prisoner of war. I can’t believe how aggressive this disease is. No amount of pain killers could stop her pain. And the amazing down hill fall in 2 days was astonishing. She couldn’t eat, Couldn’t sleep.

    Couldn’t walk, She was so weak that she was in and out of conscience Her mouth was so dehydrated, her lips were cracked, and her tongue looked like an 100 year old cockatoo’s tongue.

    Cancer research has come such a long way in the past 2 decades. When you were diagnosed with cancer back then, It was almost like a death sentence. But now with cancer research and treatments, such as radiology and chemotherapy and certain medications, a lot can be cured it’s just when it reaches the vital organs, ie. Liver, lungs, bowel, the survival rate drops dramatically,

    A lot of people these days who have passed on from cancer, their families request that donations to the cancer council are made in lieu of flowers, so more money can be put in to research. Instead of money being wasted on flowers and dying like their loved ones.

    The remarkable thing about this is that she had been to the doctors about a suspicious lump in her arm attached to a freckle. This went undiagnosed. So to anyone out there, don’t be afraid to get a second opinion, or 3rd if you are unsatisfied. If you have any enquiries call the cancer council now, 13 11 20. This is dedicated to my friend Anne Wesner, rest in peace.

    ___________________
    I'm 15. Is there anything at all i should add?
    give me some lines, or paraghraphs or sentences that i should add to it.

    Anythign thankyou!

    Thankyou, last answerer.
    Yes i know there are many eling errors, but it's only because I haven't edited yet, and yes I had planned to practice outloud haha

    should I add this too?

    There are many different cancer fundraisers, for different kinds of cancers.

    World Cancer Day is marked on February 4th to raise awareness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection, and treatment.

    Jeans for Genes is a major fundraiser of the Children's Medical Research Institute.
    This includes Jeans for Genes Day, events, exhibitions and other FUNdraising events throughout the year.

    Daffodil Day is the largest fundraising event of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere and the day of the year we invite all Australians to unite and lend their support to the fight against cancer.

    The money raised will help the Cancer Council to fund essential services, education and research programs, making a difference to lives of people with cancer today, and helping to protect lives tomorrow?

    • ANSWER:
      Can you use visuals, like a PowerPoint to accompany your speech. If so, not only could you actually show what everyone should look for, but it would also slow you down by at least 2 minutes.

      Also, if you wrote this speech on your own, for 15, you are an amazing writer. Run it thru spell check, there are just a few minor type-o's. Seriously, I've seen many speeches in my college classes and most are not as well written as yours.

      Also, practice your speech outloud at home before you give it to your class. This really helped me (even though I felt like a dork). It got me over being nervous.

  47. QUESTION:
    health questions help?
    What is key to improve cancer's survival rates?

    improve people's nutrition and lifestyle choices
    more research into better chemotherapy drugs
    programs that stress early detection and intervention
    better surgical techniques to remove all cancer cells

    34. What is the disease that involves changes in the nerves and chemicals of the brain leading to memory loss, personality changes, and complete dependency?

    Parkinson's
    Alzheimer's
    Paget's
    Grave's

    35. Which of the following is not a disorder related to hypertension?

    congestive heart failure
    stroke
    diabetes mellitus
    heart attack

    36. How is hepatitis B typically transmitted?

    fecal-oral route
    bacteria and its spores
    contaminated blood or sexual contact
    breast-feeding

    37. Which STD can cause blindness in a newborn baby if it infects the baby's eyes during the birth process while producing a greenish yellowish drainage from the reproductive organs of the infected adults?

    syphilis
    gonorrhea
    genital herpes
    chlamydia

    38. Which STD begins as chancres or open lesions on the reproductive organs and can invade the nerous system causing difficulty speaking, headaches, blurred or diminishing vision, seisures, problems with memory and thinking, and depression?

    syphilis
    gonorrhea
    genital herpes
    chlamydia

    39. Which organ is affected by hepatitis?

    brain
    stomach
    uterus
    liver

    40. Which of the following is not a form of anthrax infection?

    digestive (gastrointestinal)
    circulatory (blood)
    skin (cutaneous)
    respiratory (inhalation)

    41. The lack of which of the following hormones from the pancreas prevents the body from regulating its own blood sugar?

    insulin
    adrenaline
    testosterone
    melanin

    42. Which of the following bacterial STDs is the most common in the United States causing the formation of a painless lesion which may result in scarring of the pelvic organs and sterility?

    gonorrhea
    genital warts
    syphilis
    chlamydia

    43. What is the cause of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy?

    bacteria
    virus
    prion
    fungi

    44. Which of the following best describes symptoms of BSE (Mad Cow Disease)?

    fatty plaque in the arteries leading to chest pain
    loss of the ability to sense, move, and think
    skin rash, digestive disturbances, and difficulty breathing
    severe headache or no symptoms at all

    45. Which of the following best describes symptoms of diabetes mellitus?

    crushing chest pain, nausea, weakness, and fatigue
    excessive urination, thirst, and hunger
    flu-like symptoms, headache, and stiff neck
    loss of coordination on one side, slurred speech, and difficulty concentrating

    46. Which of the following could cause a non-communicable disease?

    viruses
    bacteria
    smoking
    fungi

    47. Which of the following is an example of a communicable disease?

    Alzheimer's disease
    common cold
    heart disease
    diabetes mellitus

    48. Which of the following is NOT a reason it is difficult to cope with a chronic illness?

    financial obligations to cover treatment and care that health insurance may not cover
    loss of physical independence which requires more assistance with the activities of daily living
    knowledge that the person will get better with the appropriate medications
    dealing with depression and grief for the diagnosis

    49. When does the HIV positive stage move into full-blown AIDS?

    when the red blood cell count rises above 7 million cells per cubic millimeter
    when the cells have metastasized from their original location to the brain
    when the heart fails to pump blood properly causing swelling and difficulty breathing
    when the T-cell count falls below 200 cells per cubic millimeter

    50. Which of the following is NOT a leading cause of death in the United States today?

    pneumonia
    heart attack
    stroke
    diabetes mellitus

    • ANSWER:
      ask the data from the DOH

  48. QUESTION:
    Health Majors Please help! Last test on health & i am really stressed.?
    These are some of the ones i dont know. I mean there are ones out of this that i do know but yeah, I am really stressed and need help. Please Please help me.

    27. Which type of diabetes generally occurs in young adults and children and always requires insulin as part of the treatment plan?

    type 1
    type 2
    type 3
    type 4

    28. Which of the following is NOT a warning sign of skin cancer?

    crushing chest pain
    a sore that does not heal
    unusual bleeding or discharge
    thickening or lumps

    29. What is the most fatal form of skin cancer associated with moles?

    squamous cell carcinoma
    basal cell carcinoma
    malignant melanoma
    acute cell melanoma

    30. What disease is caused by a bacteria and can be sent in a powdery form for bioterrorism and leads to difficulty breathing and even death?

    West Nile virus
    anthrax
    bovine spongiform encephalopathy
    stroke

    31. What is the general name for all infections that cause diarrhea to occur?

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Crohn's Disease
    Colon Cancer
    Dysentery

    32. Which fat leads to atherosclerosis and can contribute to one's risk of a heart attack or stroke?

    steroids
    cholesterol
    phospholipids
    olive oil

    33. What is key to improve cancer's survival rates?

    improve people's nutrition and lifestyle choices
    more research into better chemotherapy drugs
    programs that stress early detection and intervention
    better surgical techniques to remove all cancer cells

    34. What is the disease that involves changes in the nerves and chemicals of the brain leading to memory loss, personality changes, and complete dependency?

    Parkinson's
    Alzheimer's
    Paget's
    Grave's

    35. Which of the following is not a disorder related to hypertension?

    congestive heart failure
    stroke
    diabetes mellitus
    heart attack

    36. How is hepatitis B typically transmitted?

    fecal-oral route
    bacteria and its spores
    contaminated blood or sexual contact
    breast-feeding

    37. Which STD can cause blindness in a newborn baby if it infects the baby's eyes during the birth process while producing a greenish yellowish drainage from the reproductive organs of the infected adults?

    syphilis
    gonorrhea
    genital herpes
    chlamydia

    38. Which STD begins as chancres or open lesions on the reproductive organs and can invade the nerous system causing difficulty speaking, headaches, blurred or diminishing vision, seisures, problems with memory and thinking, and depression?

    syphilis
    gonorrhea
    genital herpes
    chlamydia

    39. Which organ is affected by hepatitis?

    brain
    stomach
    uterus
    liver

    40. Which of the following is not a form of anthrax infection?

    digestive
    circulatory
    skin
    respiratory

    41. The lack of which of the following hormones from the pancreas prevents the body from regulating its own blood sugar?

    insulin
    adrenaline
    testosterone
    melanin

    42. Which of the following bacterial STDs is the most common in the United States causing the formation of a painless lesion which may result in scarring of the pelvic organs and sterility?

    gonorrhea
    genital warts
    syphilis
    chlamydia

    43. What is the cause of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy?

    bacteria
    virus
    prion
    fungi

    44. Which of the following best describes symptoms of BSE (Mad Cow Disease)?

    fatty plaque in the arteries leading to chest pain
    loss of the ability to sense, move, and think
    skin rash, digestive disturbances, and difficulty breathing
    severe headache or no symptoms at all

    45. Which of the following best describes symptoms of diabetes mellitus?

    crushing chest pain, nausea, weakness, and fatigue
    excessive urination, thirst, and hunger
    flu-like symptoms, headache, and stiff neck
    loss of coordination on one side, slurred speech, and difficulty concentrating

    46. Which of the following could cause a non-communicable disease?

    viruses
    bacteria
    smoking
    fungi

    47. Which of the following is an example of a communicable disease?

    Alzheimer's disease
    common cold
    heart disease
    diabetes mellitus

    48. Which of the following is NOT a reason it is difficult to cope with a chronic illness?

    financial obligations to cover treatment and care that health insurance may not

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, who made up these questions? I'm not that impressed.
      These questions have been around for awhile - you could have just searched Y!A and found identically worded questions.
      .
      While you may be stressed, if you don't know the answers to some of these, what are you doing in this class?
      Just entering all of the answers takes more time than you spent cutting and pasting them.

      27. Type 1 - the body does not produce insulin read this article: http://www.lifescript.com/Health/Conditions/Diabetes/The_Double_Whammy_What_is_Type_3_Diabetes.aspx

      28 Crushing chest pain

      29. Malignant melanoma
      http://www.cancercenter.com/skin-cancer-melanoma.htm

      30. Anthrax
      https://health.google.com/health/ref/Anthrax

      31. Question does not make sense because it is not accurate but the answer has to be dysentery as the other 3 options are not infection related
      http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/diarrhea/

      32. cholesterol
      http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/Atherosclerosis/Atherosclerosis_Causes.html

      33. all of the above but if you have to chose one go with programs which stress early detection and insurance plans which cover intervention

      34. Alzheimer's followed by Parkinson's with dementia

      35. Diabetes - but there is a relationship
      http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=2152

      36. Hep B is transmitted through blood and bodily fluids - read and figure out the answer
      http://www.hepb.org/hepb/transmission.htm

      37. Several can cause eye infection but the answer you want is gonorrhea
      http://www.wdxcyber.com/stds_pregnancy.html
      38. see: reference above for answer

      39. see: reference in question #36 or just think about it

      40. see: question #30 reference

      41. see: question #27 reference

      42. see: question #37 reference

      43. Mad Cow Disease - caused by watching too much Boston Legal in reruns - ok, it is thought to be a prion disease http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bovine_spongiform_encephalopathy

      44. see: reference in #43

      45. excessive urination, thirst and hunger

      46. this one's on you to think about

      47. You don't know this one? That's nothing to sneeze at

      48. You should be aware of the fact that you can add the rest of the answer by simply returning and adding it.

  49. QUESTION:
    wondering why any doctor would subject anyone to chemo?
    Chemotherapy Quotes
    "Two to 4% of cancers respond to chemotherapy….The bottom line is for a few kinds of cancer chemo is a life extending procedure---Hodgkin's disease, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL), Testicular cancer, and Choriocarcinoma."---Ralph Moss, Ph.D. 1995 Author of Questioning Chemotherapy.

    "NCI now actually anticipates further increases, and not decreases, in cancer mortality rates, from 171/100,000 in 1984 to 175/100,000 by the year 2000!"--Samuel Epstein.

    "A study of over 10,000 patients shows clearly that chemo’s supposedly strong track record with Hodgkin’s disease (lymphoma) is actually a lie. Patients who underwent chemo were 14 times more likely to develop leukemia and 6 times more likely to develop cancers of the bones, joints, and soft tissues than those patients who did not undergo chemotherapy (NCI Journal 87:10)."—John Diamond

    Children who are successfully treated for Hodgkin's disease are 18 times more likely later to develop secondary malignant tumours. Girls face a 35 per cent chance of developing breast cancer by the time they are 40---which is 75 times greater than the average. The risk of leukemia increased markedly four years after the ending of successful treatment, and reached a plateau after 14 years, but the risk of developing solid tumours remained high and approached 30 per cent at 30 years (New Eng J Med, March 21, 1996)

    "Success of most chemotherapy is appalling…There is no scientific evidence for its ability to extend in any appreciable way the lives of patients suffering from the most common organic cancer…chemotherapy for malignancies too advanced for surgery which accounts for 80% of all cancers is a scientific wasteland."---Dr Ulrich Abel. 1990

    The New England Journal of Medicine Reports— War on Cancer Is a Failure: Despite billion spent on research and treatments since 1970, cancer remains "undefeated," with a death rate not lower but 6% higher in 1997 than 1970, stated John C. Bailar III, M.D., Ph.D., and Heather L. Gornik, M.H.S., both of the Department of Health Studies at the University of Chicago in Illinois. "The war against cancer is far from over," stated Dr. Bailar. "The effect of new treatments for cancer on mortality has been largely disappointing."

    "My studies have proved conclusively that untreated cancer victims live up to four times longer than treated individuals. If one has cancer and opts to do nothing at all, he will live longer and feel better than if he undergoes radiation, chemotherapy or surgery, other than when used in immediate life-threatening situations."---Prof Jones. (1956 Transactions of the N.Y. Academy of Medical Sciences, vol 6. There is a fifty page article by Hardin Jones of National Cancer Institute of Bethesda, Maryland. He surveyed global cancer of all types and compared the untreated and the treated, to conclude that the untreated outlives the treated, both in terms of quality and in terms of quantity. Secondly he said, "Cancer does not cure". Third he said "There is a physiological mechanism which finishes off an individual".)

    "With some cancers, notably liver, lung, pancreas, bone and advanced breast, our 5 year survival from traditional therapy alone is virtually the same as it was 30 years ago."---P Quillin, Ph.D.

    "1.7% increase in terms of success rate a year, its nothing. By the time we get to the 24 century we might have effective treatments, Star Trek will be long gone by that time." Ralph Moss.

    "….chemotherapy’s success record is dismal. It can achieve remissions in about 7% of all human cancers; for an additional 15% of cases, survival can be "prolonged" beyond the point at which death would be expected without treatment. This type of survival is not the same as a cure or even restored quality of life."—John Diamond, M.D.

    "Keep in mind that the 5 year mark is still used as the official guideline for "cure" by mainstream oncologists. Statistically, the 5 year cure makes chemotherapy look good for certain kinds of cancer, but when you follow cancer patients beyond 5 years, the reality often shifts in a dramatic way."—Diamond.

    Studies show that women taking tamoxifen after surviving breast cancer then have a high propensity to develop endometrial cancer. The NCI and Zeneca Pharmaceuticals, which makes the drug, aggressively lobbied State of California regulators to keep them from adding tamoxifen to their list of carcinogens. Zeneca is one of the sponsors of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    "Most cancer patients in this country die of chemotherapy…Chemotherapy does not eliminate breast, colon or lung cancers. This fact has been documented for over a decade. Yet doctors still use chemotherapy for these tumours…Women with breast cancer are likely to die faster with chemo than without it."—Alan Levin, M.D.

    According to the Cancer Statistics for 1995, published by the ACS in their small journal (2), the 5-year survival rate has improved from 50%-56% for whites and 39%-40% for bl
    Gary, did you bother to read? if I'm not mistaken the NEJ of medicine was quoted as well as several md's which if I'm not mistaken stands for medical doctors, also some with PHD's. what more do you need?I don't recall mentioning anything about alt med.
    I watched my mother, my aunt, her husband , a friend die from this treatment, and now my cousin is dying from this junk science, don't even bother to defend it. it's monstrous, but you are welcome to believe it if you want, I don't and I'll take my chances, as you'll take your's. good luck

    • ANSWER:
      "Quotes" ?

      Yep, quote mining is a poor and frequently invalid form of taking a quote out of context and pretending it is a fact on its own.

      Don't forget: Increases in cancer are due to people living longer so they are more likely to die of cancer (we all have to die of something!). Dying at 85 from cancer, rather than at 35 from scurvy is known as "medical progress".

  50. QUESTION:
    seriously i need someone to talk to or im gunna go crazy?
    i have had a rough time since last year and it all trails up to here and now
    on january 6th(two days before his birthday) my boyfriend (since 4th grade im going to be in tenth for 2011-2012)was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, nearly 14 months later he was in a car accednt-a drunk driver rammed into the passenger side of his truck the drunk was thrown 20 feet and broke his back landing on a semi's hood(he deserved it)
    blew his left pupal hitting his head on the car's door and left him permintly parshily blind, got his face horribly cut up, lost his right arm(prity much lost it in the wreck)a good chunk of his left ear was cut off from glass, he was impaled with a metal rod and lost his appendix and impaled his lung when i finaly got to see him he was black and blue all over with a sickly greenish yellow tinge-he smiled at me but i could see how much pain he was in and he said go with her(wich made me confused)

    due to complications with his lungs and liver from the cancer and then loosing a lot of blood he died three days later

    my cousin died in an accident last summer-there was nothing anybody could do it just happened to him and that's all that matters hes dead and gone, never again am i to see his happy smilin face again his life was cut too short in an accident that we had no control over. he was crushed when his tractor flipped over on top of him wile mowing a ditch
    in my town im known for being a kindhearted animal lover, but quite fierce when it comes to protecting the ones i hold dear
    and then the most horrible part of it all
    on october 14, 2010 around 12:15 my older sister(who was living with my mom and me for a while) came bursting into my room(startling me out of a deep sleep) and said that i needed to get up and go outside
    i knew right away something was completely wrong because her face was way too slack and emotionless and she sounded almost like a panicked animal backed into a corner without anywhere to run or hide
    i flew out of bed, past her and outside to the front porch (we have about 24 cement steps leading down to a cement driveway) and at the bottom of the steps was my mother, lying on the ground unconscious
    my sister called an ambulance when she realized that mom wasn't responding to anything she did
    they said that the town ambulance was out on another call so they would call another from the nearest town, which was 7 miles away, not very far, only a couple of minutes away
    it took an agonizing 1 hour and 45 minutes for the ambulance to get to my house,
    which is in the middle of town(about 100 people) and it took about 30 minutes for a
    police officer to get to where i was
    it takes about an hour to get to the emergency room of the closest hospital
    the doctor said that my mom had severe brain injury and he said she had less than a 30%
    chance to make it
    the hospital we were at wasn't well enough equipped for brain injuries so they airlifted her to
    the main hospital in the state -which is in Kearney- almost four hours from where i live
    she had to have 4 brain surgeries
    1 to get all of the access blood off of her brain
    2 to take a piece of her scull out to relieve pressure
    3 the get more blood off of her brain
    4 to get her scull back in after the swelling went down and stabilized for a while
    after the first surgery my sister asked the new doctor what percentage she had of survival (sorry if i worded it confusingly) and the doctor asked what she heard from the last Doctor so she told him
    and when she said 30% he looked at her like she grew a second head, and then slowly said she actually has a LOT better than that because we get lots of brain injuries like this in a year and i would say the survival rate is really about 85%
    my mother was in a coma for over a month
    she was in rehab for a wile to get better (physically and mentally relearning stuff) around
    december she started getting weird infections in the incision on her head and last month
    they finally realized that the bone flap(skull) that they had stuck back in, had died
    she went into surgery to get it re removed and currently has to wear a helmet everywhere she goes due to the fact that she has no skull in that particular area
    in time she will get a replacement made out of plastic
    my mother is different in a lot of ways now compared to what she was, but i expected that
    she is no longer "mom" but that doesn't change the fact that im glad that i still have her alive and well, because "mom" or not i still love her the same and always will
    but i still do miss the way she was with every bit of my heart
    im a 16 year old girl with a lot of love and life ahead of her and i probably will have some pretty
    rough spots like this one, but hey, who doesnt
    shes been through h*ll and back and i find hope in the fact that she wakes up with a smile on her face and a ready and waiting 'i love you' every day
    and on top of it im in love with my bes

    • ANSWER:
      It does seem as if you've gone through a rough patch. I can't give you any cliche saying like "i know how it feels" because I really dont. Quite frankly it must suck. But the good thing is you've come on here and talked about it. and that is how you heal.

      You know...you are a strong person for dealing with this all along keeping your head on your shoulders. And I hope you know that. But if you can get thhrough this, i think you can get through anything. Try and take things just one day at a time. Think of all the good things that happen in a day...even if its as simple as five minutes in the sun.

      Life is about balance. In the end, the good is equal to the bad....

      i can tell that you'll have learned a lot from these experiences. You will always have that throughout life.

      While you'll come to miss the ones you lost. You can keep them alive in your heart. The memories are movies and your mind is a cinema...you can sit down and watch whenever you like. All of the good feelings that came from them can be revisited. They still happened.

      I mean i wish i could wave a wand and make it so everything didn't happen,. but life isn't a fairy tale and I'm no fairy god mother. I hope things get better for you soon. Please take care, thanks for sharing, and I'm wishing you well

      lots of big hugs from me xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


Liver Cancer Surgery

Most of the times they do not appear or are hard to detect until the problem reach to an advanced stage.

Colon Cancer Tumor Pictures

However, it is always better to know about those which can be detected. Mentioned below are some known symptoms of colon cancer. In case if any of the mentioned symptoms is present for more than a week, do seek advice of your physician about the screening for colon cancer.

Change in Bowel Habits

Tumor in the bowel brings an observed change in the habits like defecating. With the growth of tumor, you may feel the need of defecating less often and the large size of tumor will lead to constipation.

The only way to know this is to get regular screening done instead of waiting for the symptoms to appear on the surface.

Thinned Stool

The presence of tumor causes obstruction and with the growth of obstruction there is reduction in the space around. In case the tumor is present at the side of the colon tube passage, it may result into the narrowing of the stool.

Cramping or Bloating in the Stomach

Another symptom in the list of colon cancer symptoms is bloating or cramping in the stomach. Boating may be due to a bowel obstruction while cramping may be the result of constipation or diarrhea. In the advanced stages of colon cancer, tumor perforating i.e. poking through near the wall of the bowel, can lead to extreme abdominal cramping.

Lung Cancer Secrets Revealed Click here

Blood in the Stool

There may be blood in the stool which is due to the bleeding of the tumor. Nevertheless, if the tumor is present in the right colon, it is very much possible that the blood will dry up before the faeces are removed from the body. But if it is towards the left or in the rectum, it may remain fresh and thus will appear bright red.

Inexplicable Weight Loss

If you are losing weight without making any deliberate efforts, it is really something to ponder over. Often one has weight loss due to the fact that something wrong is going in the body. However, in colorectal cancer, unexplained loss in weight is one of the colon cancer symptoms and it indicates that the bowel is being blocked at some place, along the passage, by a tumor.

Exhaustion and Feelings of Fatigue

You are having proper sleep but still feel exhausted. There may be more than one reason and work load may not be the obvious one. The first possibility is that it may be due to anemia which takes place if the red blood cells are not able to carry sufficient oxygen as much they are required to. Consequently, you might feel exhausted. But it may also be due to tumors. Tumors can also be the cause of anemia.

Feel Like to Defecate but Not

You may feel like to go for defecation but you do not. This kind of sensation in the body may take place due to a tumor growing in the end of the colon or rectum.

The best option is to have screening for colon cancer on regular basis instead of depending on appearance of colon cancer symptoms.

lung cancer treatment breakthroughs Click here

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are your chances of living if you get liver cancer surgery?
    A very close person in my family has been diagnosed with liver cancer. He is gonna be getting surgery very soon an i wanna know what are the chances of him living..

    Thank you so much!!!
    Please Pray for him!

    • ANSWER:
      i will pray for the poor person from the core of heart.
      i would like to know what kind of cancer was that was it primary or
      secondary? and also was benign or malignant.
      secondary cancers are dangerous one with little chances of life.
      if it was a benign then it can have good prognosis.
      It is also important whether how much of the liver is involved by the cancer.
      Which kind of surgery is he gona have,whether whole of the liver is being removed or half of it.
      if a part of liver is being removed then the good news is that liver grows back, it has regerating power?
      if whole of it is being removed,then my frend there is no other organ in our body that can perform funtions like liver..
      a very neurotoxic(brain distroyer) substance called ammonia produced by breakdown of proteins is removed from blood by THE LIVER and due to any reason liver is failed or absent to perform this important function the ammonia accumulates in blood and stars dystroying brain ...and then end result is coma..

  2. QUESTION:
    Liver Cancer Surgery ?
    My Brother in Law have liver cancer and he is going into surgery the 14 , The doctor told him before that he just going to cut part of the liver out , but now he is saying the tumor is on the left/ or right side ( I am not sure ) where all the blood vessels located , so he have to open up to see , if the tumor is located near blood vessels then he can't remove it . I am wondering how dangerous is this surgery and what are the chances that it may fail ? Also the doctor told my sister they can't provide a translator at the day of the surgery and NEED a family member who speak English to be there , so now my sister insist me to go back for a day ( I live in another state ) Why would the doctor not to provide a translator and said that to my sister ?

    • ANSWER:
      I can not see why the hospital would not provide a translator. Is it that there is not one available? If one is not available at that time or that day then I think it is only right SOMEONE who speaks English be there. Otherwise they could say something she may not understand. I don't mean to sound nasty but why hasn't anyone in the other state took the time to learn English if you are living in America? These things are import. They have numerous classes available. Hind sight is 20/20.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is a realistic prognosis for stage 3 primary liver cancer?
    My brother, age 50, has advanced hepatitis C and liver cirrhosis. He has now been diagnosed with stage 3 primary liver cancer. Surgery is not an option. His abdominal cavity continues to fill with fluid which is removed about twice a week. What is a realistic life expectancy?

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry but it doesn’t really matter if the cancer metastasizes to a distant site nor will diet or exercise make a difference. When he feels like eating he should eat whatever he wants. Although treatment may prolong life in an individual patient it does not increase the median survival. What really matters is if there is vein involvement, he will last longer if there is not. A realistic range is about 3-7 months. At this point what is important is keeping him comfortable. You may want to talk to his doctor about hospice. Their main focus is supportive care to give him the best quality of life, pain management and to assist him and the family through this process. Best wishes to you both.

  4. QUESTION:
    when preparing for a liver transplant surgery due to stage 3 liver cancer, when do you start medicating?
    do you start taking ant-rejection medication prior to having the surgery, if it were scheduled for july 7, would you start on it in mid may?

    • ANSWER:
      This is something you should discuss with your doctor.

  5. QUESTION:
    I went for my pre-cancer liver surgery 2weeks ago removing 2cm of my liver and gall bladder.?
    until now i felt breathing difficulty and tightness of my wound making me immobile and weak. WHY?
    Also what are chances of recurance, if it do recur, is it another surgery need to perform?
    How to avoid reacurance to happen? pls. exlpain

    • ANSWER:
      I am glad that you are post-op safely. Difficulty breathing and tightness around that are will exist, as with all sugeries and in due time hoewever will wane away. However if it is a sharp tightness, or you feel severely congested (in the chest) when breathing you need to go to your doctor immediately. You could have torn the stitches, could have internal bleeding or some other condition internally.

      Check yourself for any pools of purple skin around the area of the sugery to check for intenal bleeding hwoever go to a doctor.

      As for chances of recurrence, depends on how you got the tumor, cirrhosis or due to some other factor? Usually once sugery is performed and the tumor is excised the recurrence is low unless it has already metastasized. I doubt that is the case now, (or else you would know).

      For now, rest assured, inform your doctor of your symptoms and take some electrolytes (pref. Gatorade) for your weakness.

      ~ M.R.D

  6. QUESTION:
    Is radiation or chemotherapy necessary after multiple organ cancer surgery?
    A close relative of mine recently had surgery for what was (apparently) secondary liver cancer, and during the surgery they removed his gallbladder, spleen, half of his liver and a third of his pancreas. The doctors said they think they got all of the cancer out of him, but doesn't he also need radiation or some other kind of treatment to prevent it from coming back, since it had already spread to other organs? How likely is it he's been cured just by surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      Radiation and chemo would be a cautionary measure to make sure that cells that escaped get killed, as it cannot be detected if it is only a few cells. The aim of radiation and chemo is to kill sick cells without killing the "host", hoping that the person is strong enough to survive the treatment. Surgery could only remove large enough tumors to be detectable, and as it is secondary already, there is a chance that the bad guys are all around.

  7. QUESTION:
    I am having Liver Surgery, How to write a visa invitation letter for my daughter to come help take care of me?
    I was diagnosed with liver cancer and I'm having Liver surgery to take out the cancer. Doctors told me that have 33% of surviving this cancer. I want to have my daughter with me during my surgery and to take care of me before and after the surgery.

    • ANSWER:
      The answer I give is from the ehow.com site, although it is not a specific site of any kind I think it has useful and knowledgeable information. Please do not take any information as 100% correct, always do your own information verification. (in part)

      "How to Get a Non-Immigrant Visa to Look After a Sick Relative in The USA"

      "A non-immigrant visa allows a foreign national to reside in the United States on a short-term basis. Non-immigrant visas are relatively easier to apply for than immigrant visas. However, there are many restrictions associated with non-immigrant visas. For example, non-immigrant visa holders are not eligible to work in the U.S. without a work permit. One of the challenges involved in applying for a non-immigrant visa to the U.S. is that foreign nationals always have the burden of proof, the responsibility to prove, that they have no intention whatsoever to reside in the U.S. beyond the time allowed by their visa."

      "The Non-Immigrant Visa Application Process"

      1. Contact your sick relative in the United States and have him/her write a formal letter addressed to the U.S. Embassy in your home country inviting you to the U.S. to look after them for medical reasons.
      2. Complete and submit Form DS-156, Nonimmigrant Visa Application, together with other supporting materials, such as the letter of invitation from your sick relative and proof of ties to your home country as evidence that you plan on returning upon finishing your stay in the U.S., to the U.S. Embassy in your country. You will find an electronic copy of Form DS-156 in the resources section.
      Once the U.S. Embassy in your country receives your application packet, you will be receive directions on how to schedule a non-immigrant visa interview.
      3. Attend and pass a non-immigrant visa interview at the U.S. Embassy in your home country. Upon successfully passing your non-immigrant visa, you will be issued a non-immigrant visa allowing you to arrive in the U.S. as a visitor."......

      ......"Tips & Warnings"

      When your sick relative in the U.S. writes the letter inviting you to the U.S. to take care of them, it is strongly advised that they attach medical records from his/her physician in the U.S. certifying that they are indeed sick.
      If possible, have your sick relative ask his/her physician to certify on a separate note/letter that your sick relative needs assistance from someone other than themselves. Also, be sure that your sick relative indicates in the letter why he or she cannot get help from some other person in the U.S. This is very important as Immigration Officers have to be sure that this is not a ploy to have you illegally immigrate to the U.S.
      Be sure to obey the terms and conditions of your non-immigrant visa, as violating U.S. immigration law may hurt your chances of applying for a visa or immigrating to the U.S. in the future."
      http://www.ehow.com/how_5695933_non_immigrant-after-sick-relative-usa.html
      http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/types/types_1262.html#4
      http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/temp_1305.html
      https://evisaforms.state.gov/ds156.asp
      http://www.usembassy.gov/

  8. QUESTION:
    how often should you have a pet scan after a liver resection surgery for cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      My dad had throat cancer and reconstructive surgery. His first PET scan was 6 months after surgery, then another 6 months later. Now he does not need to go again for 12 months.

  9. QUESTION:
    50 yr old woman had lung cancer surgery, experiencing, kidney, liver, failure what are her chances for recover?
    she also experienced circulation problems and may loose her feet, an ear and a finger is this something that occurs more often than we hear?

    • ANSWER:
      That's quite a list of some very serious life threatening medical problems. I would say her prognosis would be poor for recovery, but don't count her out yet. I have seen people you thought would never make it and they did.

  10. QUESTION:
    stage 4 cancer, brain surgery,in lungs,liver,fluid on lungs going to drain, going to drain...how long,,,think?
    my brother has stage 4 cancer, has already had brain surgery, its in the lungs, liver,lately he has been coughing and passing out kind of...today they they said new nodules on lungs and fluid, the are going to drain the fluid and test....what is all this about,,,is the end getting close....I just don't know

    • ANSWER:

  11. QUESTION:
    What is the best method of finding a job after recovering from a major surgery?
    I just had liver cancer surgery about three months ago and was just recently cleared to enter the workforce again. However, I do feel that I am starting over again and was wondering if anyone has any advice to give on what avenues to take to get my professional life back on track.

    • ANSWER:
      Do as you would do if you didn't have the surgery. Leg work, sending/faxing resumes, checking the computer for jobs, using the different job options (i.e., Monster job.Com) and networking. Good luck, hope you find a job.

  12. QUESTION:
    My mom has stage 4 liver cancer shes 72 years old. she start treatment next week.What is the survival rate?
    She first was diagnosed with ovarian cancer 2 years ago and was successful with surgery and treatment.Now its 4th stage liver and a small spot on the abdomen. How should I prepare myself and my family? Thanks Concern Daughter

    • ANSWER:
      Very sorry to read and say stage 4 liver cancer is the terminal stage.
      All treatment options(Very limited) are just palliative and prognosis is poor.
      You and your family must develop mental strength to face inevitable outcome.
      In such cases Hospice care is highly recommended.

  13. QUESTION:
    My father in law went in for surgery today to remove liver cancer....they couldn't operate cause cancer spread
    throughout his body.....My husband is at work right now and his mom wants me to wait for him to come home and break the news.......How do i do this keep in mind his dad is only 47 and he has 2 months to live iffffffffffff that maybe less

    • ANSWER:
      I'm going through the same situation with my Dad. This is his third bout with cancer. One prostate and two with colon, he has a colostomy. I'm here typing with tears in my eyes knowing what your husband and family is going through. Nine, yes nine years ago they told us that they would try to keep him with us through Christmas. Well he is getting by with struggles, but he's getting by. There is so much to fight for, but each individual and situation is different. As suggested by Inverse Mushroom, if he has any fight left, drop that two month thing like a hot potato, there are other options.

      http://www.cancercenter.com/

      http://health.usnews.com/usnews/health/best-hospitals/search.php?spec=ihqcanc

      The body is truly remarkable, one should not underestimate the power of prayer and what can happen with the right attitude, not only from the patient but the support network too.
      God Bless your father in law and family, ;-)

      Edit: Thanks, Lyn. ;-)

  14. QUESTION:
    My mum was diagnosed with bowel cancer 2 weeks ago. It has also spread to her liver. How bad is it?
    She had surgery last week to remove the bowel cancer, which was 90% covering her bowel. The surgery was a success, but now there are also secondary cancers in her liver. At the moment the doctor can say there are 3 lumps in the liver, but he says there may be more they dont know about.
    Mum has to start chemo in a few weeks.
    Can someone please tell me the best and worst case scenario for secondary liver cancer.
    Any advice would also be appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Best Case is that she will go through one round of treatment. Which may include hair falling out, days of extreme fatigue, and sickness. And the cancer goes away.

      Worst case is that she goes through all of that and the cancer spreads. And I do not have to tell you what the end result will be.

      I have some info I would like you to look at that may aid her in her treatment. Please consider all avenues before it is too late to help her. I totally believe in it and have seen it work in other people with Stage 4 cancer.

      You are in my prayers and I hope that all turns out well for you.

  15. QUESTION:
    Metastatic liver cancer- am looking for medical center that does the most research in that area?
    I contracted colon cancer about three years ago and had it removed by resection. This was followed by chemo using oxiplatin anf FU-5. I faired really well except for neural damage in feet. Now a spot has appeared in the upper portion of my liver which is metastatic from the colon. A local liver surgeon is planning a resection and this will undoubted be followed by more chemo. I understand the real risk is from other seedlings of the cancer which may now start to appear either in the liver or other organs and that my defenses will be really low to fight them. I am looking to find the research center who most commonly deals with metastatic colon cancer to learn as much as possible about new techniques, drugs, or whatever. I might go there for the surgery or at a minimum get a second opinion on procedure etc.

    • ANSWER:
      stanford medical center- plus u should get hold of sales reps from genentech and see if they have new study going on that is specific for liver cancer.

  16. QUESTION:
    my wifes mom,79, was told she has liver cancer/can inducing hypothermia help in surgery?has high blood press.
    are there any machines that can perform the functions of a bad liver. My mother-in-law lives in Thailand. i can be reached by fax also @ 304 723 3777

    • ANSWER:
      Is she having surgery? If so, that is good. I have put a link to a comprehensive explanation of liver cancer put out by the government. It is really good. Even if the cancer can't be fully cured, there are cases where it can be manged and treated for years.

  17. QUESTION:
    do you know what site I can get pics of liver damage caused fr chemo for colon cancer?
    I had colon cancer surgery and am taking chem treatments my liver count is up can you tell me a site to see pictures of liver damage from taking chem

    • ANSWER:
      What makes you think chemo is damaging your liver or that it would be visible?
      Your doctor is not giving you chemo to kill you.

  18. QUESTION:
    I was just wondering how long the life expectancy of liver cancer at the fourth stage was?
    My dad was just diagnosed with liver and colon cancer, he just got an operation and removed the colon cancer and he has liver cancer at the fourth stage. He is going through chemotherapy right now and i was wondering what his life expectancy was going to be and what is the worst possible thing that could happen with the chemo, we are figuring he will be on it for roughly 4 months and then a major surgery and then chemo again for another 6months to make sure everything is gone... if all goes well.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think your dad has liver cancer, as it is far more likely that he only has colon cancer with mets to the liver. I am sorry, but in this situation the 5year survival rate is only about 5%. He is being treated with chemo to buy him more time not to cure him. At this point the worst thing that can happen with the chemo is that it does not slow the progression of his disease. I have the feeling this is not what you expected to hear and I am so very sorry.

  19. QUESTION:
    whether radio surgery (cyber knife or gamma knife) is applicable in metastatic breast cancer to liver.?
    After affecting both the breasts the cancer has spread to liver the second time in two and half years time.The patient has been given chemotherapy thrice, the last one only six months ago.please advise what is the best treatment can be given to the patient in this situation.

    • ANSWER:
      They don't usually do surgery with metastatic cancers. You have to realize, that one or two lesions may light up on the scan, but typically there are dozens of lesions there in metastatic disease (usually).

  20. QUESTION:
    Survival Rate? Colon Cancer, also 3 shadows on Liver, to be looked into later!?
    Colon Cancer: Surgery 9 days ago, removed 1 tumour @ 6 inches of colon/rectum and 25 lymph nodes, 15 found to containn cancer. Stage 3-C, Recovery within 2 days. Removed from IV in 3 days, removed catheter in 3 days, walking in 2 days, Released in 4 days.
    Pulse 128/68. constant, Temp 98* constant, heart rate 75 beats p/m. Great shape, healthy except for this.
    Morphine stopped on second day, aspirin only afterwards.
    Platelets at 56 - 67. 5 units of plasma and Vit. K injections. Received whole blood during operation.
    History, HCV for 35 years, Renal carcenomia 10 years ago, Pancreatitious 1 year ago, Family history, Father & grandfather died of Liver Cancer at age of 65 and 40 respectivally. Sister with Ovarian cancer.

    • ANSWER:

  21. QUESTION:
    A family member has liver cancer & anyone know about this .....?
    My father has malignant liver cancer and it has spread to the small & large intestines. At first I had heard it was a spot and now I hear it has spread since the test. My sister said he is going to fight it and will be going to the cancer center.

    See he cannot be operated on because he had a triple bypass not long ago. So why is it that if they had that they cannot have surgery for cancer, liver cancer? Also because she said he would try to fight it, I would too, and I hope he does, but then I hear from someone else....a very reliable person, that it will be only a month or 2 and he will be gone.

    He does not look that sick. I am so upset, I have not slept good for several days now worse than usual, because I think about him being so sick with this. I am so confused of who and what to believe. Anyone know about this cancer? Thank you ahead of time.

    • ANSWER:
      first of all..im sorry to hear about it... im sure its hard on everyone in the family.

      liver cancer (hepatoma) if confined to a particular lobe of the liver.. MAY be removed surgically.
      but as u mentioned.. if the patient has had recent heart surgery.. a bypass in particular.. the benefits of undergoing the surgery do not outweigh the added risks of performing it. meaning that.. he is at risk of decreased survival more so because of the surgery than without it.
      performing surgery on a patient with heart disease is avoided because it causes increased stress on the heart... but that depends on the integrity of his heart right now...

      HOWEVER.. your father can ask his doctor the reason why not... is he not stable enough for an operation.. or is it that the tumor is inoperable... 2 different reasons...find out why.

      usually.. where the cancer has spread to other organs.. it is no longer in one place where it can be easily removed... once it has spread...surgery is not the best option for his management. Instead chemotherapy and raditaion would benefit him more...

      so including both the reasons of tumor spread (metastasis) and the history of previous cardiac surgery.... the best thing wud be to do radio/chemo...

      remember that every moment is precious... so a happy environment is always welcome! as hard as it is... you have to be strong.. for your father.

  22. QUESTION:
    What is the possibility of beating stage 4 liver cancer?
    My brother has it. And he just had surgery for his colon, which he had cancer there as well.

    • ANSWER:
      ill Pray your Brother to get well soon... i hope after this a few hours later or tomorrow.. your worried is no more..

  23. QUESTION:
    living donor liver transplant with liver cancer patient?
    my grandma has cancer in her liver.
    why cant I give her half of my liver?
    i know it's a serious surgery, but i'd be willing to do it, can anyone tell me if it's possible? because her oncologist says it's not...and I don't understand why.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh, I'm so sorry. I had a friend with liver cancer, and wondered the same thing. The answer is: it's impossible to get all of the cancer out, so if the person has a liver transplant, the cancer will spread to the transplant and you'll be back where you started with the same problem, only things will be worse because the patient will be taking immunosuppressants to prevent rejection of the donated organ, so they won't be able to fight off the cancer as well. It will spread more quickly and they'll die anyway. Another reason is that with liver cancer, they're already quite weak, so they might not survive the strains of the transplant, meaning they'll die earlier than they would have had the transplant not been done.

      Just love your grandmother and say everything you want to say to her. Leave nothing unsaid, and make sure she knows how much you love her.

  24. QUESTION:
    I want to be a donor for my baby's liver transplant. How can I lose weight quickly to be ready for the surgery
    The baby is six months old and has liver cancer. I am a 36 year old fat guy who is in relatively good health other than the weight. I have about three months to lose weight before I am suitable as a donor. I want to save my son's life but I'm about 40 pounds overweight. I'm working out and dieting pretty strenuously, but I want to do more. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      40 pounds in three months is quite a task. I would talk to a nutritionist and explain the situation to them. With their supervision you'll have a better chance of success and be assured you'll be in good health. You wouldn't want to go through all of that and then have other health issues that would exclude you from surgery. You certainly have the motivation and I wish you and your son the best.

  25. QUESTION:
    I'm really scared to get surgery on my liver!!! Please can anyone help me calm down?!?
    Im really scared right now. I'm only nine! Can anyone help calm me down. I'm really scared and i never likes the hospital. Please... I have liver cancer they said. Without this surgery I could... I could...

    • ANSWER:
      awww hunni its ok calm down... u will be ok... they will take great care of you there and they wouldnt do anything to hurt you. Just think of something you love like going to the beach or something and wat u like doing on the beach or anything and jus relax u will be fine!

  26. QUESTION:
    when breast cancer has spread to brian liver lungs and bone how much time do you have?
    21/2 years ago my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer from taking hormone replacement therapy for menopause they removed part of the breast in may 2009 they found they cancer returned they did brain surgery to remove the cancer from the brain how ever they told her it has spread to lungs liver and bones. On 9/11/09 they told her she is terminal and to start preparing for hospice. When the doctor tells you to prepare for hospice how long does she have left?

    • ANSWER:
      Very sorry to hear this.
      From experience in working in Palliative Care wards, (and having father who died from Lung Cancer), once it spreads to the brain, then the patient is already stage 4 - thankfully your mother has survived that ordeal, but now she has to battle it in the liver, lungs and bones, unfortunately this is last stage. This is hard.
      Once it is in the liver, there is little time because the liver is responsible for so many things in the body, along with the lungs.
      I cannot give you a time frame, i am not God. But keep her comfortable, alot of pain medication will help her pass without being in pain.
      In training we were taught some signs of approaching death.
      1) Shallow and irregular breathing
      2) Low urine output
      3) Little or no appetite
      and some more that i forgot.

      My dad was diagosed with lung cancer - 4 months later he was dead. It spread to the liver and bones, and brain but my mother didn't even tell me (i was 13).

      May she have a peaceful passing. God bless you and your family

  27. QUESTION:
    What is Metastatic Liver cancer? Can I survive with the latest medicine today?
    I was diagnose with Advance Rectal Cancer that spread to my Liver and to my lympnodes. Also a tumor that totatlly block my anus that why the doctor give me a colostomy surgery.

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry to hear your diagnosis. Metastatic liver cancer is cancer in the liver that has spread there from another location. In this case, your colo-rectal cancer spread to your liver.

      Cancer that has metastasized almost never can be cured, but chemotherapy, radiation, or perhaps surgery can sometimes control symptoms and extend your life.

  28. QUESTION:
    my father in law had surgery for cancer on his esophagus and lung.now on his liver.is chemo a good idea?

    • ANSWER:
      No, its not necessary at all. Its too draconian a procedure to undergo, there are other options. These links might help you.

      http://www.cancertutor.com/

      http://www.scribd.com/doc/14150181/Why-Doctors-Do-Not-Take-Chemo

      http://www.naturalnews.com/027526_Suzanne_Somers_curing_cancer.html

      http://www.naturalnews.com/026322_Macrobiotic_Diet_cancer_food.html

  29. QUESTION:
    My Uncle is dying from Liver Cancer?
    My Uncle has liver cancer and has had cancer now for 3 years. It started in his colin and went to his liver. He has had two surgeries in his liver to get the cancer out. He now needs one more sugery. He has been on chemotherapy for the last three years as well. He has a 9 year old daughter and a wife. He can not work due to the severity of the cancer and his insurance will not approve any more treatment. He needs to get more chemo and surgery so he can live 20 more years. My question is does any one know of any insurane plans that would help, any funding groups that would help, or how to raise money for him? Please let me know if you could help with any information. Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      If the treatment is no longer doing anything to help him live, then the insurance company (and probably the doctor) is not going to keep agreeing to it. Just because there is treatment available doesn't mean the treatment will work. This is all very painful and requires the family to look at another way of handling this.

  30. QUESTION:
    My aunt had surgery for her colon cancer, but now there's cancer lesions on her liver. Is it curable?
    She's in a hospice program for the terminally ill because they say there is no cure for colon cancer. If there was no cure, what is the chemotherapy for?

    How much time does she have left?
    http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/guide/treatment-stage?page=2

    This site says the 5-year survival rate for Dukes D Colon Cancer is about 8%.

    Does that mean only 8% of the people live past five years?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, if you're aunt has lesions in her liver, then her cancer is most likely incurable. It means that it has metastasized (spread from her bowel to liver). The reason they are offering chemotherapy is that chemo can be used even in palliative patients to slow progression, but primarily to reduce symptoms. i.e. If someone has a cancer in their throat that has spread to their liver, chemo may be offered to slow the growth of the cancer in their throat so they can continue to eat alone without the aid of medical devices.

      Your interpretation of the 5 year survival rate is correct.

  31. QUESTION:
    husband just diagnosed with colon cancer metastatic to liver what is life expectancy with treatment?
    has had surgery to remove the colon cancer
    His colon cancer is Stage IV , he hasn't had any chemo treatments yet, we are to see his the cancer dr. soon. Yes, we are right with God, very active with our church family. I just wanted to know what others may can tell me that have been thru this before. Know nothing about chemo. He has a large mass in right lobe of liver and several smaller ones in the left lobe.

    • ANSWER:
      http://coloncancersupport.colonclub.com/viewforum.php?f=1

      Please visit this forum; it has many wonderful people on it currently fighting and in remission from colon cancer or colon-rectal cancer. There are Stage IV survivors and fighters that post as well and they are all a very informative group of people.

  32. QUESTION:
    Liver Cancer Questions?
    Earlier this year my aunt was diagnosed with liver cancer. She's had some surgeries to remove a large part of the tumor and some lymph nodes, but the doctors have found that the cancer has sort of "swiss-cheesed" itself through out her liver for want of a better descripiton. They're waiting until she heals more after the last surgery to decide if they want to try chemo or radiation.

    Obviously we're hoping for the best, but we all know that liver cancer is most often terminal. My aunt and uncle are reluctant to discuss anything other than recovery, but can someone give me a realistic life expectancy for her if the chemo or radiation is unsuccessful?

    • ANSWER:
      To answer that question properly, one would need a lot more information. And, even at that all you can do is give averages. For example, for a particular kind of brain cancer the average expectancy is 13 months after diagnosis, but some people die in a few weeks and some live for years. There's really no way to say for certain, especially without knowing more specific details about your aunt's case.

  33. QUESTION:
    Inoperable liver cancer from colon cancer?
    My father-in-law has been diagnosed with colon cancer and secondary liver cancer. He has just had surgery to remove the affected part of his colon, but the liver cancer is inoperable. He will undergo radiation and chemotherapy once he recovers from the surgery. The doctor has said, depending on how he responds to treatment, that he may have as little as 2 months or as long as 5 years to live.

    My question is regarding my husband. He lost his mother to breast cancer 9 years ago and now he is going through it all over again with his father. I know he is hurting, but he's very unwilling to talk about it. He and his father are very close. On top of it all, he is now becoming pessimistic about his own health, knowing that both of his parents will have died young.

    I am doing the best I can to imagine how he is feeling, but I know I can't really understand. Can anyone offer any advice on things I should say to him? I have tried optimism, but he doesn't want to hear it.

    • ANSWER:
      The best thing you can do for him right now, is just to be there when he wants to talk, if he needs a hug, or some encouragement. He probably already realizes he's going to lose his father and it's a bit much for him right now. Do what you can to help his father out in any way, ask him(or his Dad) what you can do, anything you can do, and it will go a long way with your husband. If he wants a little space right now, give him some, let him spend as much time with his father as he can...little things that will mean a lot once his father passes.

  34. QUESTION:
    Tell me more about liver and lung tumors, how many types of cancer, treatment options?
    My mom just found out that she has type II diabetes, 5 or 6 tumors in her liver and 5 or 6 tumors in her lungs. They did a liver biopsy on Fri. and they're doing a MRI on Monday of her brain and a bone scan and mamogram also. They also want to check her colon. Is this serious? She had cervical cancer about 18 years ago and had surgery to remove it. How many types of cancer and what are the treatment options for her condition. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      What they have found with your Mom is definitely serious, which is why they want to do all of the tests you mention.

      There seem to be new cancers discovered every year, so there is no simple answer as to how many cancers there are. The treatments are surgery, radiation with x-rays, and chemo-therapy. There are also alternative medicine approaches which occasionally work for cases that are not advanced.

  35. QUESTION:
    I would like to know if anyone has had a cat with cancer? What was the outcome if you had surgery done?
    I have a nine year old female cat that has one large lump with several small lumps around it and this lump is red and she also has another lump that is sort of black in color. I had her to the vet and she is pretty sure that it is cancer. She said that she could do radical surgery on both lumps and she would probably be alright. She also said that it could come back in 6 months to a year. The cost is 0.00. We just had another cat put down in April it had liver disease and we spent almost 0.00 to make him confortable before we put him down and he was 12 years old. It was really hard on me to put him down so I am beside myself what to do with this other cat. I also have a cat that is 23 years old and he is doing pretty good for as old as he is. I would appreciate knowing if anyone else had a cat with lumps on the belly and you had the surgery what the outcome was. I know a few people that had dogs with cancer and in the end after surgery they still had to be put down.

    • ANSWER:
      I had a cat with tumours in her mammary area. I think it cost around 700 to have her operated on. It was a hard decision as we were sort of strapped at the time, but she was fairly young (about 4 I think), and she was a great cat.

      Also I just couldn't think of how to tell the kids I was willing to let their cat die, so I elected to have the surgery done. However, it was going to be another 100 for the pathology work and I didn't have that done because it wouldn't make any difference to our subsequent decisions.

      The cat lived another 10 or 12 happy years.

  36. QUESTION:
    Liver cancer - secondary?
    Dad will be 87 in a week. He had surgery for colon cancer last year. Nov. CAT scan showed a 3cm tumor in his liver. As of April/08 it is 5.1cm x 4.1. He is not going to treat it. So far, so good; he feels fine. He lives on his own. From your experience, what can we expect re: symptoms and general time frame. The websites I found don't deal with non-treated cancer. Doc told me not to concern myself with hospice at this time; that Dad's overall condition is okay. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Your dad has metastatic carcinoma in the liver from primary colon adenocarcinoma. Tumor has already spread beyond the primary site. It is not a good sign.

      Doctor may not give any treatment considering his age. He already had big colon resection surgery for cancer. Now he may not be able to tolerate any other cancer treatment for metastatic.

      Doctor may closely follow up his condition and when time comes may consider to put him hospice.

  37. QUESTION:
    My mother has to have her kidney removed due to kidney cancer, how long does the surgery take?
    My mother found out 2 weeks ago she's got kidney cancer, it has spread to her renal vein, liver and lungs. She has a 12 centimeter tumor on her left kidney and has to have her left kidney removed by open surgery, How long does this surgery usually take? My husband and I have agreed that I would stay and take care of her when she got out of the hospital. I would also like to know if its possibly that she will be in icu for a day or so? if anyone can help I would appreciate it.

    • ANSWER:
      It all depends on what the docs are gonna do. I had a partial nephrectomy in Dec, 2005, the cancer hadnt spread to their knowledge(still checking) but the surgery took almost six hours, they did it laproscopically, and they wanted to make sure they got it all out. I never spent time in ICU, but was in the hospital for 4 days. It was pretty miserable, but I made it. i would assume no more than a couple of hours in surgery if they do it open. I wish her the best of luck! Feel free to email me at dmckinner@yahoo.com, if I can offer you the name of a great renal cancer specialist, or be of assistance.

  38. QUESTION:
    Liver Cancer surgeon in Northern Calif.?
    We have to find a good liver cancer surgeon in Northern California please help. I am diagnosed with liver cancer and have to have the surgery.

    • ANSWER:
      who does your oncologist recommend? Who does your insurance recommend?

  39. QUESTION:
    Survival rate for liver cancer?
    I just found out that a friend of mine has a liver cancer. which happen to grow on her liver within the pass 6 month. Doc stated that they are not sure if they will treated her with chemo theraphy, medication for surgery. Yet, no exact info given until he speak with the cancer doctor. I'm stress out very bad and was wondering what could possibly happen? Can it be cure?

    • ANSWER:
      Survival rates for liver cancer are very difficult to predict. Physicians tend to be very cautious about making prediction. Those people who have a "will to live" seem to defy the odds. The treatment makes a difference too.

      Generally, physicians have had very little training in nutrition and they tend to poo poo anything that is outside their area of experience and training. The chemo specialist tends to recommend chemo and the surgeon will tend to recommend surgery. You are pretty much on your own when it comes to nutrition, but most people don't give this enough consideration. I suggest you read up on cancer and nutrition for yourself and perhaps for the benefit of your friend. Please note that there may be some interaction between chemo treatments and diet, so tread carefully here. Meat may help neutralize some of the toxic effects of chemo, although generally, animal proteins promote the growth of cancers.

      The most solid research about nutrition and liver cancer has been done by a Professor at Cornell University. Over a period of 30 years, he has found strong correlations between cancer and casein (cow milk protein). Animal proteins tend to promote the growth of cancers.

  40. QUESTION:
    Colon/ Liver Cancer Question?
    My mum was diagnosed with colon cancer that had spread to her liver 6 months, at the time she was told she had 3-6 months to live. A few weeks later she underwent surgery to have the majority of the tumors in the liver removed.

    She still has a few small lesions on her liver, up at the top and some on the right hand side approx 7/9 – she had 3 months of chemo and once the review came they said it was a ‘mixed response’ some had grown a little- some stayed the same.

    They didn’t do a scan of the bowel, Why is this? As they need the tumor there to shrink to undergo surgery on the bowel/ liver at the same time.

    Another concern is that they always scan her chest to see if it’s clear, I know its a common place for the cancer to break off to- but what is the likely hood and how long would it take?

    Thanks a lot

    • ANSWER:
      The liver is the most common place for colon cancer to spread to. It is a little strange to be given 3-6 months to live and still be doing surgery and chemo. However, she should have had a colon resection before chemo started and if any liver lesions are removed it is usually done then. It is pointless to remove them and leave the cancer in the colon and they usually don’t remove them if there are more than 2-3. If the liver was scanned than the colon was too. It is impossible to know if or when it may spread to the lungs.

  41. QUESTION:
    Primary Liver Cancer..?(please help:( ) Im begging you :l?
    Growing up,having a blind mother,and shes a single mom cause my dad and her were divorced wen i was 4,life is an obstacle. For the past 2 months,my dad has finally tell me he has liver cancer,worst of all? Hes int he hospital rite now, the doctor says he cant do anything else but hes hoping to cure my dad.My dad pukes blood out,and his stomach gets bloated up,he cant urinate and he has loss a lot of blood so he has about 4 bloodbags and 9 waterbags...he cant speak currently and the doctor says he might not make it this pass days.. my question is,can he have surgery and use my liver?I can take his liver and die,and he can keep mine and live? He also has a tumor though.. and is my liver fully developed for him to have this surgery?im 13 and im willing to trade my liver in,for my dad.:(

    • ANSWER:
      Given the stage his liver is at, it is more than likely that the cancer has spread beyond the liver.

      Even if you were a perfectly compatible match (no guarantees that you are) it is unlikely that your father would be well enough to go through a transplant proceedure or that it would make him well.

      At 13 there is no way anyone would allow you to do this.

      Sorry, but it would be an exercise in futillity.

  42. QUESTION:
    Questions about other whom dealt with Esophageal Cancer that spread to liver?
    My father was diagnosed 2 yrs ago from Esophageal cancer (adenocarcinoma). There was a spot on his liver, but they were not sure that it was cancer. He had chemo - radiation, then surgery. they did 2 more rounds of chemo to make sure. Then scans came back clean. 3 months later, another scan and it's back. So he's been having chemo for more then 9 months. we got news that the cancer has grown in the lymph nodes around the surgery site, as well as in his liver. The cancer in his liver has doubled. Doctors are not giving up and are going to try to give him another chemo. My heart is breaking, seeing him go through this. Im like a zombie. Im afraid his body is going to just give up, since this new chemo can affect his liver and lungs. Im loosing all hope, and am trying to prepare my mind. Should I give up hope? Im not trying to be negative, but Im afraid to have false hope then be even more devastated. Ive had false hope with my father in law when we thought he'd be ok, but after a short 6 month battle with colon cancer/liver cancer, he died.
    I am not allowed to go to his appointment nor am I allowed to ask his doctors anything. Sometimes I think that they are not telling me everything.

    • ANSWER:
      Under no circumstances never, ever, give up hope. Don't forget that all through this world Great and wonderful minds are trying there hardest to find a cure for this relentless disease against humanity. although we bare the hardships of what we still do not understand, the major breakthroughs are coming every day, And be sure my dear " It Will Be Licked One Day"
      I agree it's hard not to Know what is going on and that you seem to be kept out of the equation because you are hurting so much too, but remember you must look on the positive side and stand strong for one day you may be needed to be strong.
      You can always talk to us anytime :: www.ashfordlaryngectomyclub.co.uk
      Best wishes and never give up from Steve Boyce

  43. QUESTION:
    My relative has a wide spread liver cancer.. Is there any chance of recovery? ;(?
    As i was saying, my relative has liver cancer. (wide spread)
    He's in the Hospital.
    He doesn't know about it, cuz he would cry and think too much about it.
    He is too weak for a Chemo therapy..
    I doubt that he will get a surgery.

    Is there ANY and i mean ANY chance that he could.. survive...
    Is the anyone that had the same problem and survived it?Beaten it? How?

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Has Doctor pronounced it as a case stage 4 liver cancer?
      If no consult Hepatobiliary/GI oncologist.
      There is still hope for internal arterial occlusion.
      You must also discuss other options with DOC.

  44. QUESTION:
    On May 2nd 2008 my mother was told she had colon cancer . It has spread to her liver. Is chemo gonna help?
    The doctor told us that she is in stage four.Will chemo just make it worse for her to enjoy her last days,or will it help her stay alive longer or even cure her? She had surgery to remove the cancer from her colon almost two weeks ago She has already lost 75 pounds and is weak . Is the end near? When do you know when to say enough already and let them go?

    • ANSWER:
      The doctors will not offer chemo unless they believe it will have a chance of improving either her quality or duration of life.

      When to say "enough"? It's not your decision....you'll have to be guided by your mother if she is mentally able to understand the information and potential outcomes (I don't mean that nastily...some cancer patients simply switch off and decide not to "know" anything about their condition....in which case a medical guardian will have to make choices)

      If your mother understands her situation, and the choices, talk to her. Understand what she's thinking about the options, and support her in working through them. THen whatever SHE decides, support her in that too. It may be a tough ride, but try and bring the normal into her world...tell her about your work / day / friends, what you did in town today...take her mind away from drugs, therapy, IV's and doctors.

      If you are the one who has to say "enough", then listen carefully to the doctors and nurses. Especially the nurses....they are experienced in end stages, and if you find a good one, s/he can help you decide. S/he won't tell you what to do...but listen to what is NOT said...when the time comes, you'll know it's time to stop.

      Good luck.

  45. QUESTION:
    How did my puppy get liver cancer?
    After a week of being at the vets, getting treated for the "it could be"s, getting transfusions, shots, and pills, and being very lethargic with an abdomen full of blood, that wasn't realized until 5 days after he was admitted, my 11 month old puppy, not even a year old yet, had exploratory surgery, where they found his liver riddled with cancer. He was put down last night before he even woke up from the surgery. How did he get this? I cannot find anything on the internet, the vets are pretty well stumped and I can't even wrap my head around not having my puppy anymore. Did he get it from his food? Is is environmental? Did I expose him to something that caused this? Was it genetic? HELP!
    Already contacted his breeder. They have not heard of any of their other puppies getting this. He was watched like a hawk from the time we got him. Never got into anything, never chewed on anything that wasn't his to chew on, was never left alone while outside, and the only time he was alone was when he was in his crate.

    • ANSWER:
      SO Sorry for your loss of one so young.
      #
      I don't think you will ever find the answer. Don't beat yourself up over it. Sheesh.

      ADDED: Why the 5 TD ???

      Hope there is not something I said that has been mis-translated - "Don't beat yourself up" is a British term meaning do not blame yourself. Is that it???

      I meant to sympathise, not insult!

  46. QUESTION:
    does long term use of dapkine (sodium valporate) causes liver cancer and complications ?
    i am epilitic after a surgery i had been using it for about 15 years now
    i am scared if its continuation will cause liver cancer

    • ANSWER:
      No, dont worry about it. But there are some side effects, if some member of your family had broblems with his liver you should check it with your doctor..but i am sure your doctor already checked.
      Check the side effects.........

  47. QUESTION:
    Any info. on ablation done for liver cancer?
    My father had surgery last week to remove a tumor in his liver. The tumor was too large and an ablation was done instead. The tumor came from the colon. He has been told that the tumor is now gone. Anyone have any info. on ablation in liver cancer and the life expectancy?

    • ANSWER:
      Not all stage IV colon cancers are the same. For example, the NCI reports that patients with 3 or less hepatic (liver) metastases have a five-year survival rate of 20 to 30%.

  48. QUESTION:
    What does a dream with a liver cancer and an out of control car mean?
    Ok, first, I had a dream that I was a doctor and I was doing an important surgery for this one person. He had liver cancer or it seemed like it, then I made a small mistake during the surgery and I pretended I didnt, then my mom comes out off no where and say, wait for me to help you.
    Then, all of a sudden my dream changed, I was inside a mini van in the back seat, then I recognized that my mom was outside going inside of a building and that no one was driving the car, so I leaped to the drivers seat and took the wheel, I drove the car down the crowded road and turned into a parking lot, while I braked, I noticed the brakes was not good, but they still worked decently, anyway, I managed to get safely to the building my mom was in without any accidents or troubles at all, During that time, I was very nervous in my dream because I had no experience driving and I didn't have a drivers license.
    So what does these dreams mean?

    • ANSWER:
      ok I'm NOT a psychic or a dream interpreter but i'll tell you what i think it means. the surgeon part means that there is something you regret not doing in your past that you had control of......and you regret putting other people down (like your mom maybe) more than you regret putting yourself down for not going through with what you were able and supposed to do at the time.

      the car part i dont know but i used dream dictionary to find out. this is what they said:

      To dream that you are driving a car, denotes your ambition, your drive and your ability to navigate from one stage of your life to another. Consider how smooth or rough the car ride is. If you are driving the car, then you are taking an active role in the way your life is going. However, if you are the passenger, then you are taking a passive role. If you are in the backseat of the car, then it indicates that you are putting yourself down and are allowing others to take over. This may be a result of low self-esteem or low self-confidence. Overall, this dream symbol is an indication of your dependence and degree of control you have on your life. (http://www.dreammoods.com/dreamdictionary/c.htm)

  49. QUESTION:
    My brother has Colon cancer, and now liver cancer.?
    My brother has Colon cancer, he's only 33 years old. He says it's the size of his fist, and they found a black spot on his liver.

    What's his chances of living :( if he goes for surgery and chemo

    He's my older brother, and he's been there for me my whole life, I can't lose him.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends if that "black spot on his liver" is metastatic colon carcinoma or not.
      Adenocarcinoma of the colon tends to be aggressive in people this young, but he will likely have aggressive treatment surgically and medically.

      The best thing to do here is take one step at a time and see. The doctors who know the histology of his colon carcinoma and can see the liver scans are obviously the best people to answer this question.

      It is always a good idea to go to the doctors' offices with a family member to hear what the doctors explain and to ask your own questions. Your presence with the patient at the office is evidence of approval that the information provided may be shared with you. At least that is always how I perceived it - tacit consent for all the family members who came along to my office with my patients. Sometimes I would have 8 or more family members with a patient, but that was far better than explaining a complicated scenario 9 different times for each person individually. I always encouraged my patients to bring family members in with them if they wanted the information shared.

      Patient confidentiality has become increasingly strict in the past ten or fifteen years in the U.S. Even for the doctors who know the details of the case, it is never possible to know how well any special individual will do or how long they might live. Every person is different. Statistical averages do not tell you what one individual will do. People often misinterpret statistics as predictions of the future. No doctor can see the future with certainty.

      Added note - Colon cleansing after someone already has a colon carcinoma is too late.

  50. QUESTION:
    is liver cancer curable?
    my aunt had breast cancer. after chemo it was gone but now its in her liver. she has a few spots, on thats 4 inches, one thats 3 inches and a couple that are smaller. What are that chances that with chemo or surgery it would go away?? Doctors say its incurable, if so, how long might she have to live??

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that pretty much every cancer is curable! Just BELIEVE!

      But if the doctors say so it's too developed or something.


Liver Cancer Specialist In Md

When you think about dangerous, life-threatening and abused drugs, there's one which is high on the list which you've probably used on many occasions.

Believe it or not, Tylenol and the generic versions of it can kill. And the latest research shows now, it's the leading cause of liver failure.

For those in the medical field, it's no surprise that tylenol is actually potentially a very dangerous medication. Part of what makes it so dangerous is that the lay public doesn't know that. And because many believe it to be safe, very often little consideration is given to taking the drug exactly as directed.

Dr. Douglas Dietrich, liver specialist at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, says, aPeople always consider aspirin and ibuprophen to be more dangerous because it can cause bleeding and ulcers but acetaminophen can actually be much more sneakier and cause liver damage in people who least expect it.a

Acetaminophen--the active ingredient in tylenol-- has long known to be a highly dangerous medication if used in amounts above those recommended.
The dosage adds up; if people are on more than one over the counter medicine which contain acetaminophen, like cold remedies, and there are dozens, they could be unknowingly taking too much.

Dr. Dietrich says, aSo how much is to much is the next question. Four grams a day is the maximum anyone should take.a

But many people get much more than this. Now, the latest research shows overdosing on acetaminophen is now the most common cause of acute liver failure in the United States.

It causes at least 42 percent of all cases seen at liver centers. About half of these cases are due to unintentional poisoning as opposed to attempted suicides, the researchers added. More than a third of those who unintentionally overdosed took at least two acetaminophen preparations at the same time

aHalf of these were unintentional people just had colds and they were taking medicine for aches and pains,a says Dr. Dietrich.

Overall, about 30 percent of those who develop acetaminophen-related acute liver failure will die.
Those with any kind of liver insufficiency are especially at risk.

aSo if you are set up for it it doesn't take very much Tylenol or acetaminophen to put you in liver failure or might kill you or get a liver transplant,a Dr. Dietrich states.

So, when thinking about using Tylenol, one needs to be smart.

aTwo Tylenol at one time would be the most that I've taken. I have never exceeded the recommend dose as stated on the bottle,a says Sarah Wheeler, a 28 year old who is careful about using the medicine.

And that's the bottom line to any medication.

Overall 662 patients treated for liver failure were studied. The average dose taken was 24 grams--the equivalent of 48 extra strength tablets.

The unintentional overdoses were seen in those who tended to be older, taking several medications containing Tylenol, on other medicines for pain and also used narcotics and alcohol, all setting up liver insufficiency, making the liver more susceptible to Tylenol.