Alcoholic Liver Disease Symptoms Cirrhosis

Liver, just below the diaphragm, right side, approximately 2 kilograms in weight dark red color is a soft organ. Necessary to live a lot of chemical events occur here. Liver Duty: – The day is approximately 4 cups 1 liter secretes bile. – Fat, protein and regulates glucose metabolism. – The body’s temperature settings. – Body in need of water and makes vitamin. – Oil, protein, sugar and blood is necessary for the construction materials store, Adjusts the amount of blood. – On the role of hormones is effective.

Liver can not make any of the above-mentioned tasks will become if, various diseases occur. One of the most important ones, liver failure, liver inflammation, liver cirrhosis, gallbladder stones and gallbladder inflammation is.

Chronic alcohol poisoning, chronic liver tract diseases, malaria, syphilis, jaundice in the case of diseases such as severe liver tissue is damaged.

Instead of the tissue collapsed connective tissue typical of cirrhosis occurs. Usually between the ages of 40-60 is seen in men.

Liver swelling: Any liver disease during liver cell swelling and blockage of the bile duct as a result an emerging. In the language of medicine is called hepatitis jaundice. All the tissues of the patient or an even yellow white of eyes is painted. Urine becomes dark. Itching of the skin is visible.

Liver failure:
Liver the result does not do enough in common tasks is a disease. Symptoms of intestinal gas, abdominal swelling, pain in the right flank, nose, reddening, pale color, face and get spots such as freckles, strawberry tongue, bitter mouth, nausea, constipation, palpitation, swelling of the hands and feet, decreased vision and hearing can be seen. Urine color, dark mornings, the day is clear. Urine is much quit. Patient’s chocolate, spicy foods, pickles, fried food, and should not eat fatty things.

Liver Common Symptoms of disease: The patient feels pains in the right flank are in excess of intestinal gas. Swollen abdomen, anus nasty smells coming out of gas. Skin color and sometimes it turns yellow eye whites. Spots on the face and hands are like freckles. Complains of indigestion. In the language of rust and bitterness in the mouth feels in the morning. Breath also smells. Feels pain in the neck in the morning. Palpitations, loss of appetite is. The color of yellow and dark urine in the morning, in the later hours, the clear and open. I often go to the urine. Calf muscles are sore. The hands and feet are swelling. Does not want to sleep at night. Vision and hearing or feeling weak.
a Digestive disorders, mild nausea, loss of appetite, gas first express symptoms.
a They then jaundice, abdominal dropsy, severe symptoms such as weight loss occurs.
a Leather the color of dirty yellow.
a Most of the time hemorrhoids bleeding are seen.

CAUTION :
Abdominal bloating after seeing the treatment of cases not taken seriously go to the road, but unless the patient can live 3-4 years.

A diet rich in protein should be applied, as well liver should be given nutritious vitamins. Alcohol and fries type food should be forbidden.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the outcome after being diadnosed with non alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver?
    After having a routine MRI some abnormalities showed up which led to further testing and a liver biopsy. It appears that at sometime in the past I had auto immune hepatitis that went undiagnosed. I really didn’t have any symptoms other then fatigue but then I was always fatigued for other reasons. As of right now even with the cirrohsis my liver function is normal but my liver enzymes are elevated but not high enough for treatment. I realize the hepatitis could flare up again which would call for aggressive treatment to prevent any further scaring of my liver. I have read all kinds of information on these diseases both very disturbing and some encouraging but I would just like to know if anyone who reads this has been diagnosed with this or knows someone who has and what has been the outcome.

    • ANSWER:
      I have an autoimmune disease in which my autoimmune system attacks the bile ducts in my liver. This is called primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). I am curious to know how the doctors came to the conclusion that you have a problem with your autoimmune system to the point that it has caused cirrhosis. If this is true, then this autoimmune problem has been going on for a very long time to damage your liver to the point of it being cirrhotic. I had no symptoms with my disease until my liver was already 90% destroyed with cirrhosis. I suddenly started to swell up with fluid and had no idea anything was wrong prior to that. It was a shock to me that my liver had so much cirrhosis that I would need a transplant. I had no idea anything was going on inside of me.

      That autoimmune hepatitis is probably still flaring up each and every day since it just doesn’t stop and go away. It takes many years to destroy a liver. There is really nothing much they can do as far as treating it. Sometimes they will give medication to help it, but it really doesn’t stop the disease from progressing, especially when its from your autoimmune system. When symptoms from the cirrhosis appear, they can give medications to control them and lab work is done routinely to ward off problems early. I used to have to get an endoscope done every 3-6 months to get banding done to any varices that form to lower the risk of bleeding problems. Basically, they just let the disease take its course since there is no cure other than a transplant.

      Even when my liver was 90% destroyed, my liver enzymes were just slightly above normal. My transplant doctor told me this can happen with some people, that the enzymes can almost normalize even though the disease is far advanced.

      You said you had a biopsy done. It should show the amount of damage done and how much cirrhosis (scarring) your liver has in it. Figuring out the cause of it when it is not so obvious like alcoholism, can be difficult to diagnose. That’s why I asked how they determined yours was from an autoimmune problem. I didn’t know the real cause of mine until after my transplant. The biopsy also should show whether or not there is active inflammation going on. The elevated enzymes can be an indication that there could be continued inflammation.

      The good thing is that you are still asymptomatic which means your liver is still compensating. It can stay this way for a long time. When I started to swell with fluid, that was my first sign of it starting to decompensate. Even then, I took diuretics that controlled the fluid retention quite well for several years. Once I was diagnosed with cirrhosis, I believe I went and got evaluated for transplant and was placed on the list a year later. I waited 18 months for my transplant and am doing well today. My autoimmune disease still wants to attack my new liver. I do take a medication that works well in keeping my enzymes in normal range which means there most likely will not be any damage as long as they remain that way.

      If you want to ask me anything else, just email me. I will be happy to help you if I can.

  2. QUESTION:
    Cirrhosis of the liver symptoms.. and Need Help!!?
    I have a family member who has been diagnosed 15+ years ago with cirrhosis of the liver. He is probably the largest alcoholic known to mankind. He drinks at least 30 + beers a day, and is now experiencing constant nosebleeds, for over 3 days now.. It just bleeds and bleeds when he sits up. He has blood in his urine and his stool appears blackish greenish of color and has constant diarrhea, but does not eat very often.. at all!

    I am assuming that hes in the end stages of this disease and want to know if any of you have had these issues with a family member or friend, and what is wrong and how long that this trend will continue and what will happen.

    Thank you so much for your cooperation in advance, we appreciate any answers you may have!

    • ANSWER:
      I have worked with people who had cirrhosis. They get swelling in their abdomen (ascites) & extremities (edema). The stomach can get the size of a honeydew melon.
      Vit K gets reduced & so there is more bleeding. As the toxins build up in the body, the skin begins to itch…the person becomes jaundiced & mental changes occur…sometimes during these various stages antibiotics are given.

      High potency Vit B complex can be helpful as can milk thistle. However, I don’t know how long it will prolong his life.

      Google: mayo clinic>>diseases>>cirrhosis

      I’m very sorry to hear of your situation.
      Good luck.

  3. QUESTION:
    my mom thinks she has an ear infection? seriously, i need help!?
    she’s a recovering alcoholic with cirrhosis, otherwise known as liver disease, and she can’t take pain killers or antibiotics and i was wondering what she can do!!! it seems like she just has the symptoms of a regular ear infection and i’m really worried for her, any advice?!?

    • ANSWER:
      Take her to the doctor.

  4. QUESTION:
    Cirrhosis of the Liver???Will my dad die?
    My dad has been a raging alcoholic for 20+ years. Hard liquor from the time he wakes up until the time he goes to bed. It’s his life.

    About a year ago he was admitted into the hospital for Kidney Failure but made it out of it okay.

    Just about a week ago he was admitted into the hospital because his skin and eyes had turned yellow and he collapsed. During that time the doctors explained that he was no longer a candidate for a Liver transplant, his liver was beyond repair, they can just treat the symptoms….
    He was let go after 5 days of being in the hospital because he was stable. 2 days following he was readmitted into the hospital only this time he’s worse…….
    here is a list of his symptoms;
    Fatigue
    Nausea
    Weakness (can barely lift a bottle of soda to his mouth)
    Weight loss (20 + pounds in a week)
    Exhaustion
    Stomach Pains
    Severe Jaundice….like glowing
    Very swollen abdomen
    Personality changes, forgetfullness
    Decreased mental function, slow to respond, blank stares
    Fluid retention
    Pneumonia
    Dimensia
    bad shaking
    loss of balance, equilibrium problems

    It’s just terrible and it’s breaking my heart seeing him this way.

    I was reading posts from people who had someone close with this disease, they described the same symptoms I did and there loved ones ended up dying.. I’m so afraid of that.

    What are the chances??

    Any help or enlightment would be greatly appreciated!
    Im not sure if I should be precise…..When I say fluid retention, I mean fluid in around his liver which they already had to remove
    The honest prgnosis is they are not sure at this point whether he’ll live or die.
    They say it may be time to start making out his will and planning his funeral arrangements just to be safe

    • ANSWER:
      I can answer your question because I had liver failure and a transplant. Your father has cirrhosis from his alcoholism. That is when healthy tissue is replaced with scar tissue in the liver and it can no longer function very well. Even though others will tell you the liver can regenerate, this is not the case when it comes to cirrhosis. Scarring is permanent in the liver and does not go away. The damage has been done from many years of alcohol abuse.

      Everything you told me tells me that your father is in end stage liver disease. His condition is serious and he will not get better unless he receives a transplant. When the liver is beyond repair, that is when a person needs a transplant. The problem with your father is that he is an active alcoholic. There might also be some other medical reasons he could not qualify, but that is the first thing they look at for a candidate.

      It’s very difficult for an alcoholic to receive a transplant, but there are many success stories out there. The patient has to be committed to changing their lifestyle and never drink alcohol again for the rest of their life. Transplant centers require at least 6 months of proven sobriety before they will even begin to consider an alcoholic for a transplant. The problem that happens with many alcoholics is that they don’t have 6 months left to live with their disease. They let it go too far and ignore it until they are near death before seeking help.

      I don’t know how your father feels about his disease and his alcoholism, but if he is serious about staying alive, he could go to a transplant center and at the very least talk to them. They will tell him what his options are for getting help and possibly getting a transplant if he has enough time left. If he is still drinking after all this, then I would say there is not much hope for him getting well. He has all the typical signs of end stage cirrhosis.

      It’s also extra difficult for an alcoholic to get a transplant because they not only have to deal with the cirrhosis, but they also have to deal with their addiction to alcohol. But as I said, there are many success stories. The husband of a family friend of mine just recently got his transplant and he was an alcoholic for at least 20 years+. When he found out he destroyed his liver, he went to the transplant center, did everything he was supposed to do including rehab for 6 months and submitting to random drug/alcohol testing prior to his transplant. After the 6 months, he got listed and just recently received his transplant. I hear he is doing very well now. I don’t know whether or not your father could be one of these success stories, but I want you to know that it might be an option for your father if he is willing.

      I had cirrhosis too but mine was from an autoimmune disease. No matter what the reason for having cirrhosis, it pretty much acts the same for everyone.

  5. QUESTION:
    health questions?
    fat soluble vitamins – dont build up in the body, are absorbed by fat, a lot are needed by the body, or pass easily through the blood stream

    tiny air sacs in lungs destroyed and breathing becomes harder by a disease known as – lung cancer, chronic bronchitis, emphysema

    carbon monoxide is present in blood and boday tissues and cells are deprived of – hemoglobin, carcinogens, iron, oxygen

    nicotin causes addiction and – acts as a stimulant, is a carcinogen, competes with oxygen , or destroys cilia

    a symptom of alcohol poison is – irregular heart beat, or increased respiration

    liver tissues replaced with useless scar tissue is – fatty liver, alcoholic hepititis, cirrhosis, or fetal alcoholic syndrome

    tar contained in tobacco smoke is harmful to the lungs because -
    it clogs blodd vessels, paralyzies cilia, its a stimulant, or its addictive

    a disease caused by a virus is – tuberculosis , malaria, or influenza ringworm…

    plz help….. :)

    • ANSWER:
      - are absorbed by fat
      -emphysema
      -oxygen
      -acts as a stimulant
      -increased respiration
      –cirrhosis
      -paralyzies cilia
      -influenza

  6. QUESTION:
    I NEED HELP WITH ALCOHOL FACTZ PLZZ!!! I PICK BESST ANSWER?
    A chronic liver disease caused by excessive alcohol consumption is known as:

    Cardiac sympathy

    Cirrhosis

    Pancreatitis

    Parkinson’s

    ——————————————————————————–

    Gender, emotion, mental status, and amount of time throughout consumption are a few factors that can change the effects each time alcohol is consumed by an individual.

    true

    false

    ——————————————————————————–

    All 50 states enacted a BAC limit of .08 as the legal limit for drunk drivers over the age of 21.

    true

    false

    ——————————————————————————–

    The following does NOT have the same alcohol content as a 12 oz. beer:

    Depends on the type of beer

    5 oz. glass of wine

    1.5 oz. of 80 proof distilled spirits (shot)

    none of the above

    ——————————————————————————–

    The best way to avoid a dangerous situation involving drunk driving is to:

    Avoid alcohol and drugs altogether because you don’t need them anyway.

    Do what your friends tell you to do.

    Drink just a little or limit your drug intake.

    ——————————————————————————–

    All of the following are symptoms of alcoholism except for:

    craving

    physical dependence

    tolerance (you have to drink more and more to get “buzzed.”)

    self-control

    ——————————————————————————–

    Alcohol in the stomach…

    is partially absorbed from the stomach.

    interferes with digestion of essential vitamins and minerals.

    can lead to gastritis and ulcers from long term use.

    All answers are correct.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Drinking alcohol can effect the heart, liver, stomach, and brain.

    true

    false

    ——————————————————————————–

    If you are the driver of a vehicle, there is no safe level of alcohol consumption.

    True
    False

    ——————————————————————————–

    Moderate to Excessive Binge Drinking can cause:

    health benefits for the heart, including reducing chance of heart attack

    Cardiac Arrhythmia (abnormal rhythms) and sudden cardiac death

    reduction in blood pressure and/or chance of stroke

    ——————————————————————————–

    Mandatory license plate revocation is ineffective against drunk driving.

    true

    false

    ——————————————————————————–

    ___________ are more likely to become alcoholics.

    children

    adults

    woman

    children of alcoholic parents

    ——————————————————————————–

    Which of the following is a problem a baby may have if the mother drinks alcohol while she is pregnant?

    motor skills problems

    hearing and vision problems

    premature birth

    may include problems with motor skills, hearing and vision

    ——————————————————————————–

    There are less alcohol-related fatalities for 18, 19, and 20 year olds than for the population over 21.

    true

    false

    ——————————————————————————–

    According to research what would be the single most effective deterrent for drinking and driving?

    Automatic license revocation

    Inability to post bail if arrested

    Jail sentence

    ——————————————————————————–

    This law imposes potential liability on the host of a party if alcohol is served to an obviously intoxicated person or a minor.

    adult liability

    social host

    MADD law

    minor party law

    ——————————————————————————–

    Blood Alcohol Content (BAC), is a standard used to:

    Determine what type of alcohol had been consumed

    Determine how many total drinks have been consumed

    Determine between sobriety and intoxication

    Determine how long since your last alcoholic drink

    ——————————————————————————–

    Examples of important functional skills that are not visible to others, but are affected by alcohol, are thinking skills like evaluating risk and processing information. This means that steering, braking, lane changing, and response time could be affected in a driver that has been dr

    • ANSWER:
      Cirrhosis
      True
      True
      Depends on type of beer
      Avoid alcohol & drugs
      Self Control
      All are correct
      True
      False
      Cardiac Arrhythmia
      Reduction of blood pressure
      False
      Children of alcoholic parents
      May include problems with motor skills, hearing, vision
      False
      Jail sentence
      Adult liability
      Determine between sobriety & intoxication
      True


Advanced Cirrhosis Symptoms

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Cirrhosis Treatment In India

Cirrhosis

What is cirrhosis ?

Cirrhosis is a condition in which the liver slowly deteriorates and malfunctions due to chronic injury. Scar tissue replaces healthy liver tissue, partially blocking the flow of blood through the liver….

Scarring also impairs the liver’s ability to : -

  • control infections
  • remove bacteria and toxins from the blood
  • process nutrients, hormones, and drugs…

causes

Cirrhosis has various causes. In the United States, heavy alcohol consumption and chronic hepatitis C have been the most common causes of cirrhosis….

Alcohol-related liver disease

Most people who consume alcohol do not suffer damage to the liver. But heavy alcohol use over several years can cause chronic injury to the liver….

Symptoms

Patients with cirrhosis may have few or no symptoms and signs of liver disease. Some of the symptoms may be nonspecific, that is, they don’t suggest that the liver is their cause….

Some of the more common symptoms and signs of cirrhosis include : -

  • Yellowing of the skin (jaundice) due to the accumulation of bilirubin in the blood
  • Fatigue..

Treatment

Treatment for cirrhosis depends on the cause of the disease and whether complications are present. The goals of treatment are to slow the progression of scar tissue in the liver and prevent or treat the complications of the disease…

Avoiding alcohol and other substances. People with cirrhosis are encouraged not to consume any alcohol or illicit substances, as both will cause more liver damage…

Some people with cirrhosis who develop hepatorenal failure must undergo regular hemodialysis treatment, which uses a machine to clean wastes from the blood. Medications are also given to improve blood flow through the kidneys….

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is advanced stage cirrhosis and end stage cirrhosis the same thing?
    My brother was admitted to the hospital last night because he was very swollen in the abdomen. He is only 26 years old, but he is an alcoholic. We are still waiting for the test results, but it is likely he has cirrhosis. In which stage we still do not know. However, some sites say advanced symptoms, which he has many of, while some sites talk about end stage cirrhosis which is basically fatal. I am just wondering if anyone knows if advanced and end stage mean the same thing?
    He also has mental confusion, tiredness, weakness, and no appetite.

    • ANSWER:
      When something is bothering the liver such as alcohol abuse, it can cause inflammation which can lead to fibrosis (abnormal fibrous bands in the liver). As time goes by, more and more fibrosis forms. As even more time goes by, liver cells may begin to die and scar tissue replaces healthy tissue. This is called cirrhosis.

      The doctor can do a liver biopsy to see how much fibrosis is present. Here’s how the stages go using a staging system of 0-4.

      Stage 0- no fibrosis present
      1- small amount of fibrosis
      2- a little more fibrosis present
      3- even more fibrosis present (stage 3 is bridging fibrosis)
      4- cirrhosis is present

      Anyone with even a little bit of cirrhosis is considered stage 4 which is called end stage liver disease (ESLD). All that means is that cirrhosis is present. It can be just a little to very severe. So that’s why people refer themselves as end stage if they have any cirrhosis at all.

      But cirrhosis itself also has a staging system which gives more detail. It goes by A, B, and C.

      Stage A- compensated cirrhosis (has no symptoms)
      Stage B- beginning of decompensation (needs medications and treatments to
      help control symptoms of the disease such as fluid retention, banding
      varices, etc.
      Stage C- decompensated cirrhosis (medications no longer work very well to
      control the disease and total failure is near

      The best thing your brother can do for his disease is to stop drinking all alcohol. If he already has cirrhosis, continued drinking will only make the disease progress to total failure faster. If the disease has not progressed very far, sometimes a person is able to live quite well with some cirrhosis as long as they quit drinking and do the right things in taking care of themselves. Once the damage is severe, only a transplant will save their life. They don’t give transplants to active drinkers. They require at least 6 months of proven sobriety before they will even consider you for a transplant if alcohol abuse is the cause of the cirrhosis.

      I hope this is a wake up call for your brother and he is paying attention. He is so young to have cirrhosis. Most people don’t get it this young. There could be something else going on with him besides just the alcohol problem that is causing this.

  2. QUESTION:
    advanced cirrhosis’s, liver no longer working?
    what is the life expectancy of someone whose liver is not working at all? Even if treating the symptoms, the liver no longer works. How long can one live like that?

    • ANSWER:
      If your liver was not working at all, it would be just a short time before you would die. My guess would be within a few days. But a person can live with very little liver function. I lived with 10% function for several years. I have heard of others living with as low as 5%. Now you couldn’t live a long time with that low of function, but it is quite possible to survive awhile with just a little bit of function left.

  3. QUESTION:
    prognosis for those diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver?
    heart disease patient just dignosed with cirrhosis. how long will he live?
    His symptoms are advanced-no jaundice or bleeding of the esophagous yet. Has all other symptoms-bruising, abdominal swelling, lethargy, etc.

    • ANSWER:
      Ask his doctor, only he can tell you and at that, it’s only an educated guess. When my Mom was DX with a GBM, she was give 3 weeks and lived 9 months. R.I.P. Mom!!

  4. QUESTION:
    Cirrhosis of the liver symptoms.. and Need Help!!?
    I have a family member who has been diagnosed 15+ years ago with cirrhosis of the liver. He is probably the largest alcoholic known to mankind. He drinks at least 30 + beers a day, and is now experiencing constant nosebleeds, for over 3 days now.. It just bleeds and bleeds when he sits up. He has blood in his urine and his stool appears blackish greenish of color and has constant diarrhea, but does not eat very often.. at all!

    I am assuming that hes in the end stages of this disease and want to know if any of you have had these issues with a family member or friend, and what is wrong and how long that this trend will continue and what will happen.

    Thank you so much for your cooperation in advance, we appreciate any answers you may have!

    • ANSWER:
      I have worked with people who had cirrhosis. They get swelling in their abdomen (ascites) & extremities (edema). The stomach can get the size of a honeydew melon.
      Vit K gets reduced & so there is more bleeding. As the toxins build up in the body, the skin begins to itch…the person becomes jaundiced & mental changes occur…sometimes during these various stages antibiotics are given.

      High potency Vit B complex can be helpful as can milk thistle. However, I don’t know how long it will prolong his life.

      Google: mayo clinic>>diseases>>cirrhosis

      I’m very sorry to hear of your situation.
      Good luck.

  5. QUESTION:
    Questions about severity of cirrhosis progression?
    An alcoholic family member has the symptoms listed below. I wondered if a medical professional or someone with knowledge about cirrhosis could determine how advanced this case is.

    ascites
    gynecomastia
    asterixis
    spider angiomata
    hepatopulmonary syndrome
    extreme fatigue
    muscle weakness to the point of not being able to walk

    • ANSWER:
      I had to answer this question because Ringo is SO SO wrong in his answers.

      I had cirrhosis and a liver transplant and am doing great today. No, someone with cirrhosis does not die 3-4 days after getting ascites. That’s ridiculous. It is a sign that the liver is not functioning right and can usually be controlled with medication. I had ascites and the doctors told me I could live 5-7 years before needing a transplant.

      A lot depends on what stage of cirrhosis your family member is in right now. There are 4 stages. Your family member must stop drinking now and forever. Alcohol will only cause his liver disease to progress much faster. They may or may not need a transplant. They need to go to a hepatologist that can evaluate them to see exactly how far along the disease might be.

      If they would need a transplant, all transplant centers require at least 6 months of proven sobriety before they will be considered to possibly be listed for a transplant. It a long tough road to getting well again for an alcoholic, but there are many success stories out there that have gotten their life back together and are happy and healthy today. The alcoholic not only has to stop drinking and struggle with their addiction to alcohol, but they must also deal with a diseased cirrhotic liver. It’s not going to be easy.

      When an alcoholic does stop drinking and stops poisoning their liver, then the disease process with cirrhosis can be slowed down very much as long as the liver failure is not in the very end stage. If your family member has to get tapped due to all the fluid in the abdomen accumulating quite often, like every week or two, then that would probably mean that they were in the later stage of liver failure. Even then they can do a TIPS procedure to help that, but a transplant would probably be needed soon.

  6. QUESTION:
    Liver cirrhosis and liver cancer?
    My husband has just been informed that he has “slight scarring” on the liver and that his liver is enlarged. I have many questions regarding this, but PLEASE, I am looking for serious-minded answers, not for people telling me that he should stop drinking or other kinds of moralizing; it is hard enough as it is. First: the doctor said “there is slight scarring but no sign of cirrhosis”. I don’t quite understand this because I though scarring of the liver IS cirrhosis, although it might be at a very early stage in his case. Also, is an enlarged liver the same thing as fatty liver, or could there be other reasons for it being enlarged? Unfortunately, his main health issue is not the liver but advanced heart failure (severe dilated cardiomyopathy) and also COPD. He was told some years ago that he has Hepatitis C but then it was in a dormant state. Could his Hepatitis C have caused the scarring over time even if it has been in a dormant state? Also, when the scarring has started, is it bound continue? His doctor says that his liver is “working”, although I’m not sure whether she meant that it is working without any problems or working at a diminished capacity. I have done a lot of reading and it seems to me that he has many of the symptoms associated with acute liver failure: itching and small red lesions scattered over his body, a brief (one day) period of yellow skin and vomiting, periods of flu-like symptoms with fever, loss of appetite, severe sleep disturbances, clay-colored stool, brown urine, and his nails have turned very light. Also, he quit smoking, not because of his own determination but because he lost taste for cigarettes, which apparently is a sign of liver failure. He also bruise and bleed very easily, and he is easily fatigued. Many of these symptoms are of course also associated with heart disease, but it seems that they have become worse in the last couple of months. His bleeding and bruising can of course be caused by the heavy doses of coumadin he is on, but it seems that the bruising has gotten worse too. He is also getting easy confused and is becoming more and more forgetful. He is 60 years old. So, this is what I wonder: Can the heart disease and/or the COPD have caused the liver disease, or affect it negatively? And vice versa, what effect does the liver issue have on the heart disease and the COPD? His doctor wrote in the last report that there is no sign of ascites but he keeps saying that he feels very bloated and to me it seems like fluid, not fat. He often complain of discomfort in his lower right side and get winded very easily (also a sign of the heart disease, of course). How serious is this liver problem? If in fact he does have acute liver failure due to Hepatitis C, what is the outlook? I don’t believe liver transplant is an option in his case due to his advanced heart failure and generally poor condition. If it is left untreated and he continues to drink (he has at least 3 beers and usually a couple of shots of hard liquor per day. I am desperately trying to make him stop or seek help, but I am not able to), what is likely to happen? If scar tissue continues to build up in his liver, how dangerous is it and what kind of life expectancy does he have? Is it a matter of decades or years/months before his liver gives in completely? How do people with this kind of disease typically die, slowly by wasting away or suddenly? If it is not acute liver failure, what else could it be? Does the complications of Hepatitis C always come from cirrhosis/scarring caused by it, or can it cause symptoms independently without leading to cirrhosis? And is scarring always a sign of cirrhosis or can there be other reasons for it? If so, how likely is it that the scarring does lead to cirrhosis (unless it is the same disease just at different stages) How great is the risk of developing liver cancer? Is this risk increased because of his generally poor health or is it determined by other factors? Please, please, any information at all would be of great help. I know that all these questions should be directed to his doctor, but my husband refuses to let me meet her, and he himself seems to live in denial and doesn’t want to know anything about his disease. This is my reality, and any information you could provide would be gratefully accepted. Thankyou for reading all the way through this long question.

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    Scarring of the liver and cirrhosis?
    My husband has just been informed that he has “slight scarring” on the liver and that his liver is enlarged. I have many questions regarding this, but PLEASE, I am looking for serious-minded answers, not for people telling me that he should stop drinking or other kinds of moralizing; it is hard enough as it is. First: the doctor said “there is slight scarring but no sign of cirrhosis”. I don’t quite understand this because I though scarring of the liver IS cirrhosis, although it might be at a very early stage in his case. Also, is an enlarged liver the same thing as fatty liver, or could there be other reasons for it being enlarged? Unfortunately, his main health issue is not the liver but advanced heart failure (severe dilated cardiomyopathy) and also COPD. He was told some years ago that he has Hepatitis C but then it was in a dormant state. Could his Hepatitis C have caused the scarring over time even if it has been in a dormant state? Also, when the scarring has started, is it bound continue? His doctor says that his liver is “working”, although I’m not sure whether she meant that it is working without any problems or working at a diminished capacity. I have done a lot of reading and it seems to me that he has many of the symptoms associated with acute liver failure: itching and small red lesions scattered over his body, a brief (one day) period of yellow skin and vomiting, periods of flu-like symptoms with fever, loss of appetite, severe sleep disturbances, clay-colored stool, brown urine, and his nails have turned very light. Also, he quit smoking, not because of his own determination but because he lost taste for cigarettes, which apparently is a sign of liver failure. He also bruise and bleed very easily, and he is easily fatigued. Many of these symptoms are of course also associated with heart disease, but it seems that they have become worse in the last couple of months. His bleeding and bruising can of course be caused by the heavy doses of coumadin he is on, but it seems that the bruising has gotten worse too. He is also getting easy confused and is becoming more and more forgetful. He is 60 years old. So, this is what I wonder: Can the heart disease and/or the COPD have caused the liver disease, or affect it negatively? And vice versa, what effect does the liver issue have on the heart disease and the COPD? His doctor wrote in the last report that there is no sign of ascites but he keeps saying that he feels very bloated and to me it seems like fluid, not fat. He often complain of discomfort in his lower right side and get winded very easily (also a sign of the heart disease, of course). How serious is this liver problem? If in fact he does have acute liver failure due to Hepatitis C, what is the outlook? I don’t believe liver transplant is an option in his case due to his advanced heart failure and generally poor condition. If it is left untreated and he continues to drink (he has at least 3 beers and usually a couple of shots of hard liquor per day. I am desperately trying to make him stop or seek help, but I am not able to), what is likely to happen? If scar tissue continues to build up in his liver, how dangerous is it and what kind of life expectancy does he have? Is it a matter of decades or years/months before his liver gives in completely? How do people with this kind of disease typically die, slowly by wasting away or suddenly? If it is not acute liver failure, what else could it be? Does the complications of Hepatitis C always come from cirrhosis/scarring caused by it, or can it cause symptoms independently without leading to cirrhosis? And is scarring always a sign of cirrhosis or can there be other reasons for it? If so, how likely is it that the scarring does lead to cirrhosis (unless it is the same disease just at different stages) How great is the risk of developing liver cancer? Is this risk increased because of his generally poor health or is it determined by other factors? Please, please, any information at all would be of great help. I know that all these questions should be directed to his doctor, but my husband refuses to let me meet her, and he himself seems to live in denial and doesn’t want to know anything about his disease. This is my reality, and any information you could provide would be gratefully accepted. Thankyou for reading all the way through this long question.

    • ANSWER:
      Lena, an alcoholic is THE most difficult of all patients to help, especially when you want to do so much. ALL that you describe is due to alcohol. At first alcohol causes liver cells to fill with fat and produce an enlarged fatty liver which alone has caused sudden death. In time, as liver cells die, scarring results and can then progress (under the microscope) to produce a smaller scarred liver called alcoholic cirrhosis. The liver then produces inadequate clotting factors which can produce skin and other hemorrhages, as well as leak fluid into the belly (ascites), and change blood circulation to overload and damage an eenlarging heart under strain as well as dilated, thin-walled esophageal veins (varices) which can anytime suddenly rupture as great quantities of blood are coughed up. Hepatitis c also damages the liver and is believed to be a cause of liver cancer. As long as your husband continues to drink alcohol, he will continue to go downhill and die in spite of your efforts. Try the phone book or call Al-Anon, an organization for spouses of alcoholics for much more information on how to deal with your extremely difficult situation. You cannot go it alone and expect and success.

  8. QUESTION:
    Should I stop Medication? Possible Liver problems, cant get to doctor until Monday…?
    Okay, here’s my problem.

    I’ve been on this medicine, Rocephin (IV medication) for a month exactly. I was supposed to stop medicine today according to my last doctors visit, but my doctor’s office seems to have forgotten to tell the nurses and the care provider sending my medicine… they tell me they cannot have me stop until my doctor contacts them.

    My doctor’s office closed at 1 today and is not open again until monday.. its friday. I tried to call just now because I’ve been nauseas for 2 days now, and today I’ve been throwing up. I just found that these are symptoms of liver problems, like liver cirrhosis. They had tested me before, 2 weeks in, and my liver was fine.

    I’m not sure if I should consider this an emergency (not showing advanced symptoms according to yahoo health’s information on liver cirrhosis) and go to a hospital, or if i should just temporarily stop my medicine now like the doctor had planned, even though the nurse and people said no?? Any thoughts are great…
    Oh, I forgot to mention a couple of things… Nausea and vomiting are listed as possible reactions to my medicine, so it might not even be liver stuff really. I’m just wondering mostly if I should wait to see if i get the more tell tale symptoms like jaundice or if that would be pretty much screwing myself over…

    • ANSWER:
      Even if your doctor office is closed, they still are on call. Have the service page the doctor to call you or the visiting nurse service. The antibiotic that was ordered should have the Rx included on the meds. (example being 5mg in 100ml 2x day for 7days) if not, There is a doctors order written in your chart. The visiting nurse must have access to the order and should follow it. Maybe the doctor told you 1 week but wrote 2 weeks and thats why the nurse is still giving you the meds.
      As far as liver falure from the meds, I guess its possible, but if your lab work came back ok, then i would suspect the nausea is from the meds on an empty stomach (even though its IV) or from your infection. If the whites of your eyes start turning yellow, then you have liver failure
      Hope this helps, good luck

  9. QUESTION:
    Have you had a family member suddenly die of cirrhosis without a previous diagnosis?
    My father, age 57, died suddenly (to our knowledge) from cirrhosis at the end of last year (2010). One morning he was vomiting blood, was taken to the ER, immediately given a TIPS procedure, and from then on, for the next 12 days in the ICU, he had a breathing tube and was kept sedated. He died on the 12th day. He was given 15 units of blood and 12 units of plasma, and developed SEPSIS. Several other emergency procedures were performed, including placing a stent, which ultimately failed because of a mistake on their part, and a tracheotomy. We have read that a patient with symptoms like his (sepsis, active bleeding), it is NOT recommended to place a stent. Can anyone else (please only accounts that ended in mortality will be helpful), explain what happened in the journey from sudden vomiting of blood, to rushed to the ER, to each procedure performed, if anything failed or had to be redone, and also what procedure helped the most…? I’m trying to understand his death. Is there anyone else out there that went through this? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      I’ll try and help what I can on this. Even though your father was not diagnosed with cirrhosis according to you, he certainly had it for a very long time even though he may not have known it. Is there a reason for him having it such as alcohol abuse or a viral hepatitis? There are many conditions that can cause cirrhosis, but those two are the most common. His cirrhosis was far advanced when he started this bleeding.

      Anyone having cirrhosis usually develops unwanted veins called varices or varix. These develop because of poor blood flow to the liver. They are not like the veins we are born with. They can be weak, leak and cause internal bleeding. If they become very large and burst, a person can actually bleed to death in a very short period of time. This can be the reason death occurs in some people with cirrhosis. There is a high risk for bleeding and also infection just like you father had. Many people with advanced cirrhosis die this way. I had cirrhosis and used to get checked every 3-6 months for varix. They can do a procedure called “banding” which gets rid of these unwanted veins which greatly lowers any risk of bleeding. The TIPS procedure helps to lower the high pressure in these veins thus reducing the risk of bleeding and bursting. They did an emergency one on your dad because of his hemmhorage which he really needed. It’s a stented shunt. Look it up on Wikipedia and you can learn all about it. They were trying to get this bleeding under control.

      It seems that the emergency team did everything they could to try and save his life. His cirrhosis was very advanced. Having varices is proof of that. One grew so large that is caused a massive internal bleed. They pumped him full of blood trying to replace what he had lost and also tried to lessen the pressure in the varices through the TIPS procedure. Your father might not have been breathing on his own and had to be put on a ventilator. They will do a trach sometimes for that since a ventilator is very damaging to the trachea. I had one when I received a liver transplant for cirrhosis. The sepsis and loss of blood both contributed to his death in my opinion. Both can be fatal and it’s not unusual for either one of them to take the life of someone with cirrhosis. The only cure for cirrhosis is a liver transplant. I believe they did what they could for him. You can look up cirrhosis on Wikepedia that will explain all the physiology behind the disease.

      If you are wondering why they could not give him a transplant, the answer would be that he was not stable enough to withstand the surgery and possible would not qualify to receive one. There is quite a lot to go through in order to qualify for a transplant. Your father would have just been too sick and physically unstable. If he would have gotten through his bleeding crisis, then maybe they would have sent him to a transplant center to be evaluated. It’s a long process that takes time. There are emergency transplants done such as accident victims and such, but most often, it takes time to get evaluated and accepted.

  10. QUESTION:
    Cirrhosis questions…?
    I have been told that my latest blood test shows that my liver function test is abnormal. I’ve now been sent for more tests and a scan. I have been having Sharp pain in my right side of the rib cage for over a year now. Was told a year ago that it was just muscle spasms but now there thinking different. Can anyone please tell me the symptoms.. I don’t drink ( well a shandy at the most if its sunny lol) I don’t do drugs. Also does anyone know the normal range of liver function tests ? Thanks in advance Xx

    • ANSWER:
      There are differents tests that the doctor does to check the liver…therefore,
      there would be many different “reference ranges” for each of these tests.

      No one blood testing is 100% accurate. More blood tests and a scan would
      provide a more thorough look at what may be going on.

      Some of the testing done and what is shows, is as follows:
      1]The Liver Enzyme blood tests (known as the ALT,AST,GGT,ALP,etc)
      would give the doctor an “idea” that there is liver cell damage.
      2]The Liver Function blood tests (known as the Bilirubin, INR, Pt, Ptt, Albumin)
      would give the doctor an “idea” how well the liver cells are still able to
      perform all the functions of the liver.
      3]The Liver Viral blood tests would check to see if a virus has entered
      the body and is using the liver cells to replicate itself (like Hep A,B,C,etc)
      4]The Liver blood cancer test known as the Alpha Feto protein.

      There may be no symptoms of having liver problems at the beginning,
      other than feeling tired, flu like symptoms, or discomfort in the liver/biliary area.

      Let me explain what happens when there is liver cell damage:
      The immune system would respond to this and cause inflammation to
      develop inside the liver. This would cause the liver to enlarge in size.
      (this can be seen on an ultrasound or Ct scan)

      There are many causes of liver cell damage:
      alcohol consumption, medication toxification,
      chemical exposure, mushroom poisoning,
      fatty liver disease, hereditary conditions,
      metabolic disorders, viral or parasite infection,
      biliary obstruction/malformation/infection,
      cardiac/vascular problems, cancer/cyst/growth/tumors,
      and others.

      If the cause can be found and stopped…then the liver cells
      may heal and the problem can be reversed.
      However, if it progresses to where the liver cells start to
      die off and form scar tissue inside the liver…then it becomes
      a progressive disease (that cannot be reversed) known as
      Cirrhosis of the liver.

      The liver cells are what does all the functions of the liver
      (over 500 of them). When the cells are damaged or
      they start to die off…these functions start to deteriorate.
      (This is the starting of what is known as “liver failure”)
      The first true sign of this happening is when a person
      becomes Jaundice, due to the fact that the liver isn’t
      able to the amount of Bilirubin in the blood to convert
      it to a soluble form to become part of the bile. Bilirubin
      is a pigment (greenish/brownish substance that colors
      other things). This Bilirubin will go higher in the blood
      and when it reaches a certain amount will cause the
      yellowing of the whites of the eyes and skin. Since it
      is higher in the blood and the Kidneys filter the blood,
      it can cause the urine to become darker in color.

      I know it is hard to wait and see what these tests results
      will show. But, if you do have any kind of liver problem…
      ask to be referred to either a gastroenterologist or
      hepatologist.

      They usually do blood test, then film testing like an ultrasound,
      ct scan, and then if they think it has advanced some…may
      do a liver biopsy. The liver biopsy is the best test because
      they are looking directly at the tissue of the liver and not
      just pictures of it. However, it is invasive, so they try not
      to until the last resort.

      I’m giving you information that may have gone alot farther than
      were you are at, at this moment. That is because I may not be
      able to tell you later. It may help you decide what questions
      to ask your doctor. Best wishes to you.

      LINKs to click on:

      http://www.medicinenet.com/cirrhosis/article.htm

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cirrhosis/DS00373

      http://yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/cirrhosis.html

  11. QUESTION:
    how long to people with portal hypertension and cirrhosis and liver cancer have to live if they have all of?
    these symptoms this “person” also has hep c and has been an alcholic for years she doesn’t drink everyday but she does often she sleeps all the time she coughs all the time she coughs up blood too she hardley eats she has fluid in her lungs because she smokes all the time its called something but i don’t remember her body is swallon because of all of the fluid that has built up in her stomach i was just wandering with all these bad things that have happened how long does she have left? she been seeing doctors for all of these things but doesn’t really talk to me about it thank all of you in advance
    she doesn’t take good care of herself either she has depression issues and is on anxiety meds she sets around and does nothing to help herself everyone has told her what she needs to do she just doesn’t want to do it

    • ANSWER:
      People in this situation usually just have their symptoms controlled…….for example, for the swelling to the abdomen called ascites, the docs can regularly drain the excess fluid by inserting a small drain thru the skin called a paracentesis. Portal hypertension is probably causing esophageal varices, which is why she is coughing up blood. These can be treated if they rupture, but its a big emergency.
      With regards to the liver cancer, it all depends where it is and what typre of cancer. Is the liver the primary site or a metastatic site. Would your friend be well enough for surgery/ radiation/ chemo.
      It sounds like your friend is very sick.It would be impossible to know how long she would live like this. If she takes good care of herself, doesn’t drink, and seeks regular and prompt medical care for control of her symptoms she may have a few months or even years. Hope this helps. Sorry your friend is so sick.

  12. QUESTION:
    Is there a doctor in the house……?
    If a 4 y/o has a very high hemoglobin level and the test is repeated and a test for ferritin levels is added… what might the doctor be looking for?

    I read on webmd that high ferritin levels may be caused by liver disease (cirrhosis or hepatitis), Hodgkin’s disease, leukemia, infection, inflammatory conditions (such as arthritis or lupus), or a diet that is too high in iron. The test is used to find the cause of anemia, especially iron deficiency anemia.

    I know he does not have a diet that is too high in iron.

    Question #2: Can you have anemia but have a high hemoglobin level?
    (I thought it was the other way around)

    The main symptoms that prompted the tests: extreme fatigue, headaches, bruising, night sweats

    Thanks in advance
    Kati…..Polycythemia vera… would a ferritin test help diagnose this? This is the one thing his doctor did mention but said it’s very, very rare in children so he didn’t think that was it. Would a ferritin test help diagnose it though??

    • ANSWER:
      Higher than normal levels of hemoglobin may also be caused by:

      Congenital heart disease.
      Cor pulmonale. (pulmonary heart disease)
      Polycythemia vera. (blood disorder where the bone marrow makes to many red blood cells)
      Increased red blood cell production caused by an excess of erythopoeitin.

      Hemoglobin is measured in grams per deciliter of blood. The normal levels are for a child are: 11 to 16 g/dl

      Q2: Low haemoglobin levels are more likely to cause anemia.

      EDIT: Yes it can help to diagnose Polycythemia Vera. And your doctor is right it is very rare in children. A good website about this test and Polycythemia tells you all about it.

      http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/957470-diagnosis